news

South Africa

Followers

Showing posts with label South Africa. Show all posts
Showing posts with label South Africa. Show all posts

Yoruba People Are So Loud... You Can Smell A Nigerian From A Mile Away - Iwobi Boasts

Yoruba People Are So Loud... You Can Smell A Nigerian From A Mile Away - Iwobi Boasts

Alexander Chuka Iwobi

Fulham and Super Eagles midfielder Alexander Chuka Iwobi has revealed what he loves about being a Nigerian.

Iwobi stated this in a recent interview with Kiss Fresh, London, United Kingdom.


When asked, “What do you love about Nigerians and being Nigerian?” Iwobi replied, “You can smell a Nigerian from a mile away. Our mannerisms are so Nigerian, especially Yoruba people. Yoruba people are so loud.


"My favourite thing about the country is that everyone is so welcoming, rich in hospitality and it’s like one big family. Everyone who is doing well tries to give back to their communities. Every footballer that I am with always try to give back to where they come from. That’s an amazing thing.


“The first thing I do whenever I land in Nigeria and I’m in my hotel room, I order pounded yam and egusi.”


On his choice of Nigeria instead of England, Iwobi stated he respects England but feels more at home in Nigeria, adding that football in Nigeria is like a festival, stressing that the entertaining atmosphere in Nigerian stadia gives him a sense of belonging.


“I actually felt more at home in Nigeria. Football out there is like a festival, it’s like a party. You go into the game, you see people blowing trumpets, and drums, it doesn’t even feel like a proper match. I was like, ‘Yeah, this is where I belong.’


“Of course, I have respect for England but I have no regret in choosing Nigeria.”




Iwobi represented England up to under-18 level. He made his senior international debut for Nigeria in October 2015.


The 28 years old Alexander Chuka Iwobi MON is a Nigerian professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for Premier League club Fulham and the Nigeria national team.


Iwobi began his career at Arsenal, making 149 appearances and scoring fifteen goals.


The Playmaker is expected to boss the Super Eagles midfield when they play South Africa next weekend.




Source: Social media

Alexander Chuka Iwobi

Fulham and Super Eagles midfielder Alexander Chuka Iwobi has revealed what he loves about being a Nigerian.

Iwobi stated this in a recent interview with Kiss Fresh, London, United Kingdom.


When asked, “What do you love about Nigerians and being Nigerian?” Iwobi replied, “You can smell a Nigerian from a mile away. Our mannerisms are so Nigerian, especially Yoruba people. Yoruba people are so loud.


"My favourite thing about the country is that everyone is so welcoming, rich in hospitality and it’s like one big family. Everyone who is doing well tries to give back to their communities. Every footballer that I am with always try to give back to where they come from. That’s an amazing thing.


“The first thing I do whenever I land in Nigeria and I’m in my hotel room, I order pounded yam and egusi.”


On his choice of Nigeria instead of England, Iwobi stated he respects England but feels more at home in Nigeria, adding that football in Nigeria is like a festival, stressing that the entertaining atmosphere in Nigerian stadia gives him a sense of belonging.


“I actually felt more at home in Nigeria. Football out there is like a festival, it’s like a party. You go into the game, you see people blowing trumpets, and drums, it doesn’t even feel like a proper match. I was like, ‘Yeah, this is where I belong.’


“Of course, I have respect for England but I have no regret in choosing Nigeria.”




Iwobi represented England up to under-18 level. He made his senior international debut for Nigeria in October 2015.


The 28 years old Alexander Chuka Iwobi MON is a Nigerian professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for Premier League club Fulham and the Nigeria national team.


Iwobi began his career at Arsenal, making 149 appearances and scoring fifteen goals.


The Playmaker is expected to boss the Super Eagles midfield when they play South Africa next weekend.




Source: Social media

Court bows out of Buhari's Illegality, asks CBN to unfreeze 20 #EndSARS protesters bank accounts

Court bows out of Buhari's Illegality, asks CBN to unfreeze 20 #EndSARS protesters bank accounts


A Nigeria's Federal High Court sitting in Abuja, on Wednesday, ordered the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) to unfreeze the accounts of 20 #EndSARS campaigners targeted by the apex bank after last year’s anti-police brutality demonstrations.


According to Premium Times' report on Sunday on how the accounts of the protesters remained frozen despite the expiration of the 90-day order on February 2.

The judge, Ahmed Mohammed, issued the order unfreezing the accounts after the legal teams of both the CBN and the 20 defendants decided to end the case on Wednesday.

The judge commended the two lawyers for their “commitment to ensure justice” after they announced their decision to withdraw all pending applications and the entire suit.

“In the light of this, the ex parte order issued on November 4, 2022 freezing the accounts of the defendants pending the investigation by the Central Bank of Nigeria is here by set aside.

“An order is also made unfreezing the accounts of the defendants,” Mr Mohammed ruled on Wednesday.
Hearing

Earlier, CBN’s lawyer, Michael Aondoakaa, a former Attorney-General of the Federation, told the judge he filed an ex parte application for the extension of the expired order on Tuesday, but later got instruction from the CBN Governor, Godwin Emefiele, to withdraw the case.

Mr Aondoakaa, a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, said he was withdrawing the suit in the spirit of reconciliation behind the setting up of the various Judicial Panels of Inquiry set up to probe cases of police brutality in the aftermath of the #EndSARS protests.

He said, “This matter involves young people. I talked to my colleagues and I advised, let us discard all the processes. I will withdraw my processes and they will withdraw theirs.


“By implication, the order goes, the accounts will be unfrozen, and nobody will be indicted.

“The government has set up reconciliation panels. We should give room for a rethink on this matter.

“We have the instruction from my client, the Governor of CBN, that in the spirit of reconciliation, we should not apply for the extension of the order.

“So we are withdrawing our ex parte motion. We should allow reconciliation and peace to reign.”
‘Freezing order expired last week’

Responding, the defendants’ lawyer, Femi Falana, also a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, confirmed that he had discussed with Mr Aondoakaa “on the way forward in this matter.”

He, however, insisted that “the order ex parte made by this court expired last week.”

He said he had filed “a motion to have the order quashed” but “has been overtaken by event, since the order has expired.”

After hearing the two lawyers, the judge set aside the order and struck out the suit.

Mr Aondokaa promised to ensure that that “the accounts are unfrozen” as soon as the court’s written order is issued.

The #EndSARS protesters and promoters targeted in the case by the CBN included Bolatito Oduala, Chima Ibebunjoh, Mary Kpengwa, Gatefield Nigeria Limited, Saadat Bibi, Bassey Israel, Wisdom Obi, Nicholas Osazele, Ebere Idibie, Akintomide Yusuf, Uhuo Promise, Mosopefoluwa Odeseye and Adegoke Emmanuel.


The rest are, Umoh Ekanem, Babatunde Segun, Mulu Teghenan, Mary Oshifowora, Winifred Jacob, Victor Solomon, and Idunu Williams.

Background

The 20 account holders affected by the freezing order had participated in or contributed to the #EndSARS protests which were triggered by grievances arising from years of harassment and rights violations by operatives of the defunct Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS).

The protests led to the disbandment of the police tactical squad in October last year.

In the twilight of the protests, the CBN governor, Godwin Emefiele, on October 15, 2020, directed various banks to place a Post-No-Debit order on the accounts linked to the 20 #EndSARS campaigners.

About three weeks after, the CBN, through its lawyer, Mr Aondoakaa, on November 4, 2020, obtained an ex parte order of the Federal High Court in Abuja freezing their bank accounts for 90 days.

The judge gave the order based on CBN’s allegation that the 20 defendants were suspected of terrorism financing.

The court order was widely condemned as an attack on democracy.

The protesters challenged the order but the judge, who kept adjourning the case, did not conclude hearing on the matter until Wednesday.


Source: Premium Times

A Nigeria's Federal High Court sitting in Abuja, on Wednesday, ordered the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) to unfreeze the accounts of 20 #EndSARS campaigners targeted by the apex bank after last year’s anti-police brutality demonstrations.


According to Premium Times' report on Sunday on how the accounts of the protesters remained frozen despite the expiration of the 90-day order on February 2.

The judge, Ahmed Mohammed, issued the order unfreezing the accounts after the legal teams of both the CBN and the 20 defendants decided to end the case on Wednesday.

The judge commended the two lawyers for their “commitment to ensure justice” after they announced their decision to withdraw all pending applications and the entire suit.

“In the light of this, the ex parte order issued on November 4, 2022 freezing the accounts of the defendants pending the investigation by the Central Bank of Nigeria is here by set aside.

“An order is also made unfreezing the accounts of the defendants,” Mr Mohammed ruled on Wednesday.
Hearing

Earlier, CBN’s lawyer, Michael Aondoakaa, a former Attorney-General of the Federation, told the judge he filed an ex parte application for the extension of the expired order on Tuesday, but later got instruction from the CBN Governor, Godwin Emefiele, to withdraw the case.

Mr Aondoakaa, a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, said he was withdrawing the suit in the spirit of reconciliation behind the setting up of the various Judicial Panels of Inquiry set up to probe cases of police brutality in the aftermath of the #EndSARS protests.

He said, “This matter involves young people. I talked to my colleagues and I advised, let us discard all the processes. I will withdraw my processes and they will withdraw theirs.


“By implication, the order goes, the accounts will be unfrozen, and nobody will be indicted.

“The government has set up reconciliation panels. We should give room for a rethink on this matter.

“We have the instruction from my client, the Governor of CBN, that in the spirit of reconciliation, we should not apply for the extension of the order.

“So we are withdrawing our ex parte motion. We should allow reconciliation and peace to reign.”
‘Freezing order expired last week’

Responding, the defendants’ lawyer, Femi Falana, also a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, confirmed that he had discussed with Mr Aondoakaa “on the way forward in this matter.”

He, however, insisted that “the order ex parte made by this court expired last week.”

He said he had filed “a motion to have the order quashed” but “has been overtaken by event, since the order has expired.”

After hearing the two lawyers, the judge set aside the order and struck out the suit.

Mr Aondokaa promised to ensure that that “the accounts are unfrozen” as soon as the court’s written order is issued.

The #EndSARS protesters and promoters targeted in the case by the CBN included Bolatito Oduala, Chima Ibebunjoh, Mary Kpengwa, Gatefield Nigeria Limited, Saadat Bibi, Bassey Israel, Wisdom Obi, Nicholas Osazele, Ebere Idibie, Akintomide Yusuf, Uhuo Promise, Mosopefoluwa Odeseye and Adegoke Emmanuel.


The rest are, Umoh Ekanem, Babatunde Segun, Mulu Teghenan, Mary Oshifowora, Winifred Jacob, Victor Solomon, and Idunu Williams.

Background

The 20 account holders affected by the freezing order had participated in or contributed to the #EndSARS protests which were triggered by grievances arising from years of harassment and rights violations by operatives of the defunct Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS).

The protests led to the disbandment of the police tactical squad in October last year.

In the twilight of the protests, the CBN governor, Godwin Emefiele, on October 15, 2020, directed various banks to place a Post-No-Debit order on the accounts linked to the 20 #EndSARS campaigners.

About three weeks after, the CBN, through its lawyer, Mr Aondoakaa, on November 4, 2020, obtained an ex parte order of the Federal High Court in Abuja freezing their bank accounts for 90 days.

The judge gave the order based on CBN’s allegation that the 20 defendants were suspected of terrorism financing.

The court order was widely condemned as an attack on democracy.

The protesters challenged the order but the judge, who kept adjourning the case, did not conclude hearing on the matter until Wednesday.


Source: Premium Times

Fulanis and war of Conquering: Where are the History Teachers?

Fulanis and war of Conquering: Where are the History Teachers?

This is why history must be taught in our schools. Those who neglect History are bound to repeat the mistakes of the past. 


The story is told of how King Yunfa, the Hausa Sarki in Gobir (now called Sokoto) hosted a Fulani immigrant called Usman Dan Fodiyo and his group in February 1804, as a result of this and since 1808 the whole of the northern region lost its kingdoms and were replaced by Fulani emirates.


King Yunfa is said to have been killed in 1808 and the Fulani warrior (Usman Dan Fodiyo) established Sokoto caliphate, making himself Sultan.


Gradually, other Hausa kingdoms were pillaged and taken over by the Fulani emirs including all the kingdoms ruled by Queen Amina of Zazzau... Little wonder, the Emirate throne of Zaria today is ruled by Fulani Families which Usman Dan Fodio placed on throne as a reward to his Soldiers.


The ethnic groups in the core north were the first victims of Fulani imperialism, a venture that occurred because the people were given access to grazing land as a result of the hospitality of the hosts.


They however failed to overrun the Bornu and Jukun kingdoms , so the Shehu of Bornu and Aku Uka remains paramount till today!


The Afonja dynasty compromised by allowing a Fulani warrior known as Janta Alimi to settle in Ilorin, the Fulani guerrillas killed Afonja in 1824


And Ilorin, a Yoruba town under the Oyo empire, fell into Fulani hands, becoming an emirate under Sokoto caliphate till today! Even the attempts of the O'odua People's Congress (OPC) to revert to status quo ante and crown an Onilorin of Ilorin became an exercise in futility.


The Yoruba warriors got wise and defeated the Fulani jihadists in Ogbomosho in 1840, if this didn't happen there would most likely have been Fulani "emirs" as rulers in Oyo Alaafin, Ibadan, Owo, Oshogbo, Ede, Ado, and Igede Ekiti today!


If the Bini Kingdom did not fight and repel the jihadists, they would have penetrated the Edo/Delta region beyond the present day Edo North Senatorial District which gave in and allowed the jihadists to overrun & islamize them.


Along with some ignorant folk most of them are now angling for grazing areas and a corridor through the entire federation. These grazing areas will in future become Fulani settlements, later communities and finally local government areas with elected officials.


If Yunfa didn't accommodate Fodio and his warlike immigrants from Futatoro, Hausa sarkis would be ruling today in the north!


And if Afonja didn't conspire with Alimi, a Yoruba kingdom would not have been ruled by Alimi's offspring till today!


It's an age-old political strategy really- ..create a problem, come up with a "solution" that advances the cause, and then give it a legal backing.


L'owe, l'owe la nlu ilu agidigbo.


Author: Anonymous

This is why history must be taught in our schools. Those who neglect History are bound to repeat the mistakes of the past. 


The story is told of how King Yunfa, the Hausa Sarki in Gobir (now called Sokoto) hosted a Fulani immigrant called Usman Dan Fodiyo and his group in February 1804, as a result of this and since 1808 the whole of the northern region lost its kingdoms and were replaced by Fulani emirates.


King Yunfa is said to have been killed in 1808 and the Fulani warrior (Usman Dan Fodiyo) established Sokoto caliphate, making himself Sultan.


Gradually, other Hausa kingdoms were pillaged and taken over by the Fulani emirs including all the kingdoms ruled by Queen Amina of Zazzau... Little wonder, the Emirate throne of Zaria today is ruled by Fulani Families which Usman Dan Fodio placed on throne as a reward to his Soldiers.


The ethnic groups in the core north were the first victims of Fulani imperialism, a venture that occurred because the people were given access to grazing land as a result of the hospitality of the hosts.


They however failed to overrun the Bornu and Jukun kingdoms , so the Shehu of Bornu and Aku Uka remains paramount till today!


The Afonja dynasty compromised by allowing a Fulani warrior known as Janta Alimi to settle in Ilorin, the Fulani guerrillas killed Afonja in 1824


And Ilorin, a Yoruba town under the Oyo empire, fell into Fulani hands, becoming an emirate under Sokoto caliphate till today! Even the attempts of the O'odua People's Congress (OPC) to revert to status quo ante and crown an Onilorin of Ilorin became an exercise in futility.


The Yoruba warriors got wise and defeated the Fulani jihadists in Ogbomosho in 1840, if this didn't happen there would most likely have been Fulani "emirs" as rulers in Oyo Alaafin, Ibadan, Owo, Oshogbo, Ede, Ado, and Igede Ekiti today!


If the Bini Kingdom did not fight and repel the jihadists, they would have penetrated the Edo/Delta region beyond the present day Edo North Senatorial District which gave in and allowed the jihadists to overrun & islamize them.


Along with some ignorant folk most of them are now angling for grazing areas and a corridor through the entire federation. These grazing areas will in future become Fulani settlements, later communities and finally local government areas with elected officials.


If Yunfa didn't accommodate Fodio and his warlike immigrants from Futatoro, Hausa sarkis would be ruling today in the north!


And if Afonja didn't conspire with Alimi, a Yoruba kingdom would not have been ruled by Alimi's offspring till today!


It's an age-old political strategy really- ..create a problem, come up with a "solution" that advances the cause, and then give it a legal backing.


L'owe, l'owe la nlu ilu agidigbo.


Author: Anonymous

Adams Oshiomhole: The Rise and Fall of a Labour Hero by Kunle Ajayi

Adams Oshiomhole: The Rise and Fall of a Labour Hero by Kunle Ajayi

Adams Oshiomhole

Adams Oshiomhole is probably the closest thing to political power Nigeria’s labour movements will ever have. In a remarkable career, over four-and-a-half decades, he rose to the top of both the trade union movement in the country, became a state governor and then national chairperson of the All Progressive Congress (APC), one half of Nigeria’s two-party system.


 In mid-2000 his political career came to a dramatic end when a court upheld his suspension from the APC. Vibrant and effective, Oshiomhole’s career trajectory in many ways represents the wider political subjugation of Nigeria’s labour movement.

 How this labor hero was ultimately defeated, is worth a short note.


The 1980s and 1990s marked a decade of turmoil for the Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC), the country’s largest trade union federation. Its troubles were worsened by the military’s repeated attacks on the leftist bastions of the labouwr movement. However, Oshiomhole’s appointment as NLC president in 1999, after Nigeria’s return to civilian rule, seemed to mark the opening of a new heroic chapter in the development of the movement.


Oshiomhole, now 68, came from a modest background in Edo State in southern Nigeria. He was fortunate to find factory employment with Arewa Textiles in Kaduna, a city in the northwest known as a trade and transformation center. His colleagues soon elected him union secretary. In 1971, responding to bad labor practices at his workplace, he led a shop-floor revolt. Four years later, he had become a full-time trade union organizer. Around this time, he left for the UK to study labor and industrial relations at Ruskin College in Oxford. (Ruskin had developed a reputation as an educational institution providing higher education to workers.) Later, he would also study at the National Institute for Policy and Strategic Studies (NIPS) in Kuru, Plateau State.


In 1982, Oshiomhole was appointed as the general secretary and chief executive of the National Union of Textile Garment and Tailoring Workers of Nigeria. As a 2017 report into the union’s fortunes would note: “At its peak in the 1980s, the textile industry employed up to 500,000 workers directly, making it the second largest employer after the government.” This made Oshiomhole one of the most powerful trade union leaders in Nigeria.


Oshiomhole’s emergence as a Labour and political leader is best understood within the wider historical trajectory of the NLC. From the mid-1980s, the junta of Ibrahim Babangida (1985-1993) clamped down on radical organizations and social movements as part of its imposition of neoliberal structural adjustment programs. The labour movement and the National Association of Nigeria Students (NANS) were hounded by restrictions and state agents at every turn.


In the NLC, the internal rift between progressive and the liberal forces—epitomized by the battle between Jonathan Ihonde of the Academic Staff Union of Universities and Ali Ciroma of the Amalgamated Union (Ciroma was pushed out)—led to the emergence of the charismatic Paschal Bafyau, a moderate, as president of the NLC. Unwilling to kowtow to the radical momentum of the 1990s during which the June 12, 1993 revolts against dictatorship broke-out, Bafyau couldn’t lead a coherent NLC and Babangida intervened again with a caretaker leadership. Oshiomhole, then general secretary of the National Textiles and Garments Union, was chosen to be Paschal Bafyau’s vice president. He immediately hit the ground running imbuing confidence and overseeing the rebuilding of labour’s fighting capacity.


Elected as NLC president in 1999, Oshiomhole became the darling of all workers fighting anti-labour practices and using his oratory prowess in political debates to inspire mass action. The Oshiomhole of this era bore a striking resemblance to Michael Imoudu, the legendary “Labor leader No 1,” who led the 1945 Cost of Living Allowances (COLA) strike that lasted for 45 days and shook the foundations of the colonial state.


Oshiomhole had his most heroic moments as NLC president. Under him, workers went on general strikes seven times. These strikes were about salary increases but also fought against the deregulation of the oil sector and the continued implementation of structural adjustment policies.


Oshiomhole understood the power of strikes and mobilized for them with great vigor. He usually relocated NLC structures to Lagos as the commercials center once a strike was to be announced. His bold leadership stirred President Obasanjo to accuse him of running a parallel government in 2004.


However, the tail end of Oshiomhole’s second tenure at the head of the NLC saw the evolution of the labour hero. During this period, the NLC joined the National Privatization Council, which served as the engine room for the destabilization of the Nigerian economy as production-based, marking a clear betrayal of all that labour had been fighting against. This also meant that NLC was part of the council that supervised the sale of government-owned industries, shedding large numbers of jobs while empowering cronies in the private sector. By the end of Oshiomhole’s tenure, the labour movement was left in tatters industrially and politically.


Oshiomhole was drawn into electoral politics, helping to establish the Labour Party in 2007. However, this is where the parallels between Oshiomhole and Imoudu end. While Imoudu was left leaning in practice, Oshiomhole jilted the Labour Party in favor of the bourgeois dominant formation, the Action Congress (AC), in the same year in which the Labour Party was formed. (Oshiomhole only ran a double ticket after union pressure.) The AC ultimately merged with similar parties to form the All Progressives Congress (APC).


Oshiomhole and his allies registered the Labor Party and handed it over to liberal Labour leader Dan Nwanyanwu. Under this leadership the party sold frontrunner tickets to the highest bidder while restricting union members from democratic participation. The party has yet to recover from the scars of this experience.


After gaining the governorship seat under the AC banner, Oshiomhole actively worked to prevent workers strikes. In Edo state, workers went on strikes at their union levels, but Oshiomhole violently prevented a general strike. The biggest general strike in Nigeria so far has been the Occupy Nigeria strikes in 2012. Instead of supporting the protests, despite being in the opposition, Oshiomhole helped to break the strike through a negotiation committee of which he was major state actor.


As governor, he also conducted the largest casualization of the work force by any state government thus far. More than 50,000 workers, employed through the Youth Employment Scheme (YES) in 2009, were sacked in 2015 when Oshiomhole claimed on television that he “picked them” from the “gutters.” Since this period Oshiomhole has used his overwhelming influence on both the NLC and the Trade Union Council (TUC) to ensure that general strikes are virtually forbidden under the strong-handed rule of the APC.


Oshiomhole gained a popular following in mainstream politics, retaining his characteristic khaki “comrade’s jacket”, but was increasingly seen through the godfather persona of “OshioBaba.” He has sadly also remained an example and a mentor to many in the Labour movement, and Labour activists are frequently seen in alliances with mainstream politicians in the PDP and APC. Labour bureaucrats have abandoned the Labor Party and like Oshiomhole, openly flirt with the ruling class. This is one reason why the movement lost two general strikes. However, the formation of a cluster of revolutionary organizations has brought new hope to the left and radical working class. Member organizations of the Coalition for Revolution (CORE) have been leading #RevolutionNow; the struggle precursor of the #EndSARS Protests that shook the world in late 2020.


Adams Oshiomhole rose to limelight and greatness while serving the working people as a labour leader. He managed to run Edo state government for two terms playing the devil’s advocate. In power, Oshiomhole denied workers most of what he fought for during much of his tenure at the helm of the NLC. Oshiomhole’s recent rise and fall within the APC is often viewed as the final desecration of a labour icon. Yet, it is evident that the workers movement lost its visionary leadership much earlier.


Author: Kunle Wizeman Ajayi, a Nigerian trade union leader is chair of the Lagos branch of the African Action Congress.


Adams Oshiomhole

Adams Oshiomhole is probably the closest thing to political power Nigeria’s labour movements will ever have. In a remarkable career, over four-and-a-half decades, he rose to the top of both the trade union movement in the country, became a state governor and then national chairperson of the All Progressive Congress (APC), one half of Nigeria’s two-party system.


 In mid-2000 his political career came to a dramatic end when a court upheld his suspension from the APC. Vibrant and effective, Oshiomhole’s career trajectory in many ways represents the wider political subjugation of Nigeria’s labour movement.

 How this labor hero was ultimately defeated, is worth a short note.


The 1980s and 1990s marked a decade of turmoil for the Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC), the country’s largest trade union federation. Its troubles were worsened by the military’s repeated attacks on the leftist bastions of the labouwr movement. However, Oshiomhole’s appointment as NLC president in 1999, after Nigeria’s return to civilian rule, seemed to mark the opening of a new heroic chapter in the development of the movement.


Oshiomhole, now 68, came from a modest background in Edo State in southern Nigeria. He was fortunate to find factory employment with Arewa Textiles in Kaduna, a city in the northwest known as a trade and transformation center. His colleagues soon elected him union secretary. In 1971, responding to bad labor practices at his workplace, he led a shop-floor revolt. Four years later, he had become a full-time trade union organizer. Around this time, he left for the UK to study labor and industrial relations at Ruskin College in Oxford. (Ruskin had developed a reputation as an educational institution providing higher education to workers.) Later, he would also study at the National Institute for Policy and Strategic Studies (NIPS) in Kuru, Plateau State.


In 1982, Oshiomhole was appointed as the general secretary and chief executive of the National Union of Textile Garment and Tailoring Workers of Nigeria. As a 2017 report into the union’s fortunes would note: “At its peak in the 1980s, the textile industry employed up to 500,000 workers directly, making it the second largest employer after the government.” This made Oshiomhole one of the most powerful trade union leaders in Nigeria.


Oshiomhole’s emergence as a Labour and political leader is best understood within the wider historical trajectory of the NLC. From the mid-1980s, the junta of Ibrahim Babangida (1985-1993) clamped down on radical organizations and social movements as part of its imposition of neoliberal structural adjustment programs. The labour movement and the National Association of Nigeria Students (NANS) were hounded by restrictions and state agents at every turn.


In the NLC, the internal rift between progressive and the liberal forces—epitomized by the battle between Jonathan Ihonde of the Academic Staff Union of Universities and Ali Ciroma of the Amalgamated Union (Ciroma was pushed out)—led to the emergence of the charismatic Paschal Bafyau, a moderate, as president of the NLC. Unwilling to kowtow to the radical momentum of the 1990s during which the June 12, 1993 revolts against dictatorship broke-out, Bafyau couldn’t lead a coherent NLC and Babangida intervened again with a caretaker leadership. Oshiomhole, then general secretary of the National Textiles and Garments Union, was chosen to be Paschal Bafyau’s vice president. He immediately hit the ground running imbuing confidence and overseeing the rebuilding of labour’s fighting capacity.


Elected as NLC president in 1999, Oshiomhole became the darling of all workers fighting anti-labour practices and using his oratory prowess in political debates to inspire mass action. The Oshiomhole of this era bore a striking resemblance to Michael Imoudu, the legendary “Labor leader No 1,” who led the 1945 Cost of Living Allowances (COLA) strike that lasted for 45 days and shook the foundations of the colonial state.


Oshiomhole had his most heroic moments as NLC president. Under him, workers went on general strikes seven times. These strikes were about salary increases but also fought against the deregulation of the oil sector and the continued implementation of structural adjustment policies.


Oshiomhole understood the power of strikes and mobilized for them with great vigor. He usually relocated NLC structures to Lagos as the commercials center once a strike was to be announced. His bold leadership stirred President Obasanjo to accuse him of running a parallel government in 2004.


However, the tail end of Oshiomhole’s second tenure at the head of the NLC saw the evolution of the labour hero. During this period, the NLC joined the National Privatization Council, which served as the engine room for the destabilization of the Nigerian economy as production-based, marking a clear betrayal of all that labour had been fighting against. This also meant that NLC was part of the council that supervised the sale of government-owned industries, shedding large numbers of jobs while empowering cronies in the private sector. By the end of Oshiomhole’s tenure, the labour movement was left in tatters industrially and politically.


Oshiomhole was drawn into electoral politics, helping to establish the Labour Party in 2007. However, this is where the parallels between Oshiomhole and Imoudu end. While Imoudu was left leaning in practice, Oshiomhole jilted the Labour Party in favor of the bourgeois dominant formation, the Action Congress (AC), in the same year in which the Labour Party was formed. (Oshiomhole only ran a double ticket after union pressure.) The AC ultimately merged with similar parties to form the All Progressives Congress (APC).


Oshiomhole and his allies registered the Labor Party and handed it over to liberal Labour leader Dan Nwanyanwu. Under this leadership the party sold frontrunner tickets to the highest bidder while restricting union members from democratic participation. The party has yet to recover from the scars of this experience.


After gaining the governorship seat under the AC banner, Oshiomhole actively worked to prevent workers strikes. In Edo state, workers went on strikes at their union levels, but Oshiomhole violently prevented a general strike. The biggest general strike in Nigeria so far has been the Occupy Nigeria strikes in 2012. Instead of supporting the protests, despite being in the opposition, Oshiomhole helped to break the strike through a negotiation committee of which he was major state actor.


As governor, he also conducted the largest casualization of the work force by any state government thus far. More than 50,000 workers, employed through the Youth Employment Scheme (YES) in 2009, were sacked in 2015 when Oshiomhole claimed on television that he “picked them” from the “gutters.” Since this period Oshiomhole has used his overwhelming influence on both the NLC and the Trade Union Council (TUC) to ensure that general strikes are virtually forbidden under the strong-handed rule of the APC.


Oshiomhole gained a popular following in mainstream politics, retaining his characteristic khaki “comrade’s jacket”, but was increasingly seen through the godfather persona of “OshioBaba.” He has sadly also remained an example and a mentor to many in the Labour movement, and Labour activists are frequently seen in alliances with mainstream politicians in the PDP and APC. Labour bureaucrats have abandoned the Labor Party and like Oshiomhole, openly flirt with the ruling class. This is one reason why the movement lost two general strikes. However, the formation of a cluster of revolutionary organizations has brought new hope to the left and radical working class. Member organizations of the Coalition for Revolution (CORE) have been leading #RevolutionNow; the struggle precursor of the #EndSARS Protests that shook the world in late 2020.


Adams Oshiomhole rose to limelight and greatness while serving the working people as a labour leader. He managed to run Edo state government for two terms playing the devil’s advocate. In power, Oshiomhole denied workers most of what he fought for during much of his tenure at the helm of the NLC. Oshiomhole’s recent rise and fall within the APC is often viewed as the final desecration of a labour icon. Yet, it is evident that the workers movement lost its visionary leadership much earlier.


Author: Kunle Wizeman Ajayi, a Nigerian trade union leader is chair of the Lagos branch of the African Action Congress.


#LekkiMassacre: SABOTEURS & SCOUNDRELS BY FEMI OGUNSANWO

#LekkiMassacre: SABOTEURS & SCOUNDRELS BY FEMI OGUNSANWO




I recall my strident criticisms of Bola Tinubu and Yemi Osinbajo on my page and many of my friends thought "Femi haba take it easy on them now". But people didn't realise that I have privy information about these ruiners and verminous pests

But I knew the duo are saboteurs against Yoruba race because of political ambition, how on earth will a responsible adult allowed deployment of soldiers to their land to kill their youths

Unfortunately, Yemi Osinbajo will sit tight and not resign from this administration after this massacre of defenceless youths because he sold his filthy soul to the devil already all because of 2023 Presidency which any sane person knows is transient and transitory and will there be any nation called Nigeria again sef after all what happened

Bola Tinubu is actually a scoundrel, so no surprise at all from him, a man who denied his heritage and roots to bear another name will not whimper or raise a voice against the massacre of his people and even tacitly supported the killing of his youths. He is planning to run out of the country or probably out already. Imagine these scoundrels are the ones referred to as Yoruba leaders

I am devastated now, sad, yet to sleep a wink since last night, mourning and crying for the dead whose lives were cut shut in their prime and there are some muppets out there who called these useless people "leaders" SMH

#justscribblingmythoughts





I recall my strident criticisms of Bola Tinubu and Yemi Osinbajo on my page and many of my friends thought "Femi haba take it easy on them now". But people didn't realise that I have privy information about these ruiners and verminous pests

But I knew the duo are saboteurs against Yoruba race because of political ambition, how on earth will a responsible adult allowed deployment of soldiers to their land to kill their youths

Unfortunately, Yemi Osinbajo will sit tight and not resign from this administration after this massacre of defenceless youths because he sold his filthy soul to the devil already all because of 2023 Presidency which any sane person knows is transient and transitory and will there be any nation called Nigeria again sef after all what happened

Bola Tinubu is actually a scoundrel, so no surprise at all from him, a man who denied his heritage and roots to bear another name will not whimper or raise a voice against the massacre of his people and even tacitly supported the killing of his youths. He is planning to run out of the country or probably out already. Imagine these scoundrels are the ones referred to as Yoruba leaders

I am devastated now, sad, yet to sleep a wink since last night, mourning and crying for the dead whose lives were cut shut in their prime and there are some muppets out there who called these useless people "leaders" SMH

#justscribblingmythoughts


S.Africa to 'ease' virus lockdown after April 30 - president

S.Africa to 'ease' virus lockdown after April 30 - president

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has unveiled new levels of Coronavirus which will determine which sectors of the economy would be opened in certain areas.

Ramaphosa said on Thursday night the country would implement a partial easing of the current Covid-19 lockdown after April 30, to spare the economy and save jobs.

“Beyond Thursday the 30th of April we will implement a risk adjusted strategy to take a deliberate and cautious approach to ease lockdown restrictions,” he announced.

“The strategy we take now must be measured and incremental.

“We cannot take action today that we deeply regret tomorrow.

“We have to balance the need to resume economic activity with the need to save lives.

“While a nationwide lockdown is probably the best means to contain the virus, it cannot be sustained indefinitely. Our people need to eat. They need to earn a living. Companies need to generate revenue.”

Ramaphosa said some businesses would be allowed to resume operations under specific conditions.

The return of the workforce will be no more than one-third per business.

A work from home strategy is still encouraged.

Shortly before the president's speech, the health ministry announced there were 318 new confirmed Covid-19 cases in SA, with the total number of confirmed cases at 3,953. Ten new deaths were reported, resulting in a total of 75 Covid-19 deaths across the country.

Ramaphosa announced a R500bn stimulus package earlier this week, on which finance minister Tito Mboweni will provide more details on Friday.

- TimesLIVE
South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has unveiled new levels of Coronavirus which will determine which sectors of the economy would be opened in certain areas.

Ramaphosa said on Thursday night the country would implement a partial easing of the current Covid-19 lockdown after April 30, to spare the economy and save jobs.

“Beyond Thursday the 30th of April we will implement a risk adjusted strategy to take a deliberate and cautious approach to ease lockdown restrictions,” he announced.

“The strategy we take now must be measured and incremental.

“We cannot take action today that we deeply regret tomorrow.

“We have to balance the need to resume economic activity with the need to save lives.

“While a nationwide lockdown is probably the best means to contain the virus, it cannot be sustained indefinitely. Our people need to eat. They need to earn a living. Companies need to generate revenue.”

Ramaphosa said some businesses would be allowed to resume operations under specific conditions.

The return of the workforce will be no more than one-third per business.

A work from home strategy is still encouraged.

Shortly before the president's speech, the health ministry announced there were 318 new confirmed Covid-19 cases in SA, with the total number of confirmed cases at 3,953. Ten new deaths were reported, resulting in a total of 75 Covid-19 deaths across the country.

Ramaphosa announced a R500bn stimulus package earlier this week, on which finance minister Tito Mboweni will provide more details on Friday.

- TimesLIVE

COVID-19 infection cases in Africa top 23,000, WHO reports

COVID-19 infection cases in Africa top 23,000, WHO reports

As of Tuesday, the number of coronavirus cases in Africa has reached 23,029, while 1,142 people have died, the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa branch said yesterday.

While South Africa accounts for the biggest number of infections (3,300) and 58 deaths, Algeria has the biggest COVID-19 death toll (384) and 2,718 infections.

Egypt has so far reported 239 fatalities and 3,144 cases, while Morocco identified 2,990 and 143 deaths.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, Cameroon is ranked second after South Africa with 1,163 coronavirus infections and 43 fatalities, followed by Ghana (1,042 and 9) and Ivory Coast (879 and 9).


Nigeria has also reported more that 700 cases and 25 death toll with the virus spreading to more than 24 sates and Abuja which is the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) out of the 36 states of the federation.

On Monday, Ghana became the first African country to partially lift lockdown restrictions on two biggest cities of the country, including the capital Accra.

Factories and shops are cleared to resume operation, people movement restrictions are lifted so that they can go back to work. When announcing the easing of lockdown, President of Ghana Nana Akufo-Addo underlined that there is not a single blueprint to resolve all problems.

In late December 2019, Chinese officials notified the World Health Organization (WHO) about the outbreak of a previously unknown pneumonia in the city of Wuhan, in central China. Since then, cases of the novel coronavirus - named COVID-19 by the WHO - have been reported in every corner of the globe.

Globally, over 2,484,000 people have been infected and more than 170,000 deaths have been reported with United states leading in both numbers of infected persons and death toll followed by the deaths in Europe, Italy, Spain, France and the UK accounted for more casualties and deaths after the US.

Since Chinese officials notified the World Health Organization (WHO) in late December 2019 about the outbreak of a previously unknown pneumonia in the city of Wuhan, in central China, cases of the novel coronavirus - named COVID-19 by the WHO - have been reported in every corner of the globe.
As of Tuesday, the number of coronavirus cases in Africa has reached 23,029, while 1,142 people have died, the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa branch said yesterday.

While South Africa accounts for the biggest number of infections (3,300) and 58 deaths, Algeria has the biggest COVID-19 death toll (384) and 2,718 infections.

Egypt has so far reported 239 fatalities and 3,144 cases, while Morocco identified 2,990 and 143 deaths.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, Cameroon is ranked second after South Africa with 1,163 coronavirus infections and 43 fatalities, followed by Ghana (1,042 and 9) and Ivory Coast (879 and 9).


Nigeria has also reported more that 700 cases and 25 death toll with the virus spreading to more than 24 sates and Abuja which is the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) out of the 36 states of the federation.

On Monday, Ghana became the first African country to partially lift lockdown restrictions on two biggest cities of the country, including the capital Accra.

Factories and shops are cleared to resume operation, people movement restrictions are lifted so that they can go back to work. When announcing the easing of lockdown, President of Ghana Nana Akufo-Addo underlined that there is not a single blueprint to resolve all problems.

In late December 2019, Chinese officials notified the World Health Organization (WHO) about the outbreak of a previously unknown pneumonia in the city of Wuhan, in central China. Since then, cases of the novel coronavirus - named COVID-19 by the WHO - have been reported in every corner of the globe.

Globally, over 2,484,000 people have been infected and more than 170,000 deaths have been reported with United states leading in both numbers of infected persons and death toll followed by the deaths in Europe, Italy, Spain, France and the UK accounted for more casualties and deaths after the US.

Since Chinese officials notified the World Health Organization (WHO) in late December 2019 about the outbreak of a previously unknown pneumonia in the city of Wuhan, in central China, cases of the novel coronavirus - named COVID-19 by the WHO - have been reported in every corner of the globe.

COVID-19 Deaths in Africa rise by 55 to 1,080

COVID-19 Deaths in Africa rise by 55 to 1,080

The number of COVID-19 deaths in Africa rose by 55 in the last 24 hours, with the total toll at 1,080, according to the Africa Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (Africa CDC).

According to the data compiled by the Africa CDC, total cases had reached 21,317 after 1,047 additional cases.

North Africa has been the hardest hit on the continent followed by its western, southern central and eastern regions.

Algeria registered the most deaths at 367 with 2,534 cases, while Egypt counted 224 deaths with 3,032 cases.

Morocco has reported 138 deaths out of 2,820 total cases.

South Africa registered 52 deaths with 3,034 cases.


Nigeria recorded at least 493 with 17 deaths. Prominent Nigerian politician, Abba Kyari who was the Chief of Staff to the Nigerian President, Major Gen. Muhammadu Buhari was among the COVID-19 deaths recorded in the African most populous nation.

The novel coronavirus has spread to 185 countries and regions since emerging in China last December, with the U.S. and Europe now the hardest-hit areas in the world.

More than 2.38 million cases have been reported worldwide, with the death toll exceeding 165,600 and recoveries over 611,700, according to data compiled by the U.S.-based Johns Hopkins University.
The number of COVID-19 deaths in Africa rose by 55 in the last 24 hours, with the total toll at 1,080, according to the Africa Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (Africa CDC).

According to the data compiled by the Africa CDC, total cases had reached 21,317 after 1,047 additional cases.

North Africa has been the hardest hit on the continent followed by its western, southern central and eastern regions.

Algeria registered the most deaths at 367 with 2,534 cases, while Egypt counted 224 deaths with 3,032 cases.

Morocco has reported 138 deaths out of 2,820 total cases.

South Africa registered 52 deaths with 3,034 cases.


Nigeria recorded at least 493 with 17 deaths. Prominent Nigerian politician, Abba Kyari who was the Chief of Staff to the Nigerian President, Major Gen. Muhammadu Buhari was among the COVID-19 deaths recorded in the African most populous nation.

The novel coronavirus has spread to 185 countries and regions since emerging in China last December, with the U.S. and Europe now the hardest-hit areas in the world.

More than 2.38 million cases have been reported worldwide, with the death toll exceeding 165,600 and recoveries over 611,700, according to data compiled by the U.S.-based Johns Hopkins University.

Somali state minister dies from coronavirus as South Africa cases rise to 2,173

Somali state minister dies from coronavirus as South Africa cases rise to 2,173

In an African war ravaged country, the justice minister of Somalia's autonomous Hirshabelle state, Khalif Mumin Tohow, has died after contracting the novel coronavirus, the second recorded death in the country.

Tohow died on Sunday in Mogadishu's Martini hospital a day after he tested positive for COVID-19 in the town of Jowhar, the administrative capital of Hirshabelle.

According to local media, Tohow, who was Somali-British, travelled to the United Kingdom in February before he came back to the Horn of Africa nation.

Meanwhile, South Africa has announced 145 new coronavirus cases, taking the total number of infections to 2,173, a health ministry statement said.

The statement stopped short of specifying whether any new fatalities had been recorded, which stood at 25 as of Saturday.

Currently, Africa states are less hit by the pandemic but are likely to face dare economic breakdown most especially export dependent economies in the continent. 

Globally the death toll from the Coronavirus has exceeded 109,000 while the infection confirmed cases worldwide have also exceeded 1.7mln people.
In an African war ravaged country, the justice minister of Somalia's autonomous Hirshabelle state, Khalif Mumin Tohow, has died after contracting the novel coronavirus, the second recorded death in the country.

Tohow died on Sunday in Mogadishu's Martini hospital a day after he tested positive for COVID-19 in the town of Jowhar, the administrative capital of Hirshabelle.

According to local media, Tohow, who was Somali-British, travelled to the United Kingdom in February before he came back to the Horn of Africa nation.

Meanwhile, South Africa has announced 145 new coronavirus cases, taking the total number of infections to 2,173, a health ministry statement said.

The statement stopped short of specifying whether any new fatalities had been recorded, which stood at 25 as of Saturday.

Currently, Africa states are less hit by the pandemic but are likely to face dare economic breakdown most especially export dependent economies in the continent. 

Globally the death toll from the Coronavirus has exceeded 109,000 while the infection confirmed cases worldwide have also exceeded 1.7mln people.

COVID-19: South Africa rolls out mobile testing in virus lockdown

COVID-19: South Africa rolls out mobile testing in virus lockdown

South African public healthcare workers dispersed into the buzzing streets of Johannesburg's Yeoville neighbourhood as Africa's worst virus-hit country rolled out mass door-to-door testing for COVID-19.

Armed with screening questionnaires and testing kits, medics and volunteers set up their testing station on the front porch of a block of flats in the gritty business neighbourhood.

Nurse Xola Dlomo told AFP they were asking one resident to mobilise fellow flat dwellers to come for screening and tests.

"They've been coming for screening and they are even open to testing if they have symptoms," Dlomo said.

Already in a 21-day lockdown, South Africa is now embarking on the widespread testing and quarantine campaign involving some 10,000 field workers who are being sent out into homes in villages, towns and cities to screen for symptoms.

The testing plan to break the chain of infection appears to be modelled on the South Korean strategy which saw the Asian country bring the outbreak under control.

South Africa has so far reported nine deaths and 1,585 infections, but Health Minister Zweli Mkhize has warned that the relatively small growth in numbers was perhaps "the calm before a heavy and devastating storm".

In Yeoville -- a crime-prone area in Johannesburg's hardscrabble central business district -- eight small groups have been dispatched across an area covering one square kilometre.

"The health of our people is our first consideration," said Kegorapetse Ndingandinga, overseeing the Yeoville team.

- Scaling up testing -

With his head tilted back, 58-year-old Michael Moshone, braced for his nasal swab, seated on a brick staircase in Yeoville.

"It is a little bit uncomfortable but you've got to be strong... because you want to know exactly what is going on with you," Moshone, wrapped in a green, gold and black scarf, said after his sample was taken.

Before the rollout of mass screening and testing, more than 47,500 tests had been performed, 6,000 of them at public health centres.

But for the heath minister, that number is too low for a country of 57 million people where several million have underlying conditions such as HIV and TB.

The turnout was slow on the first day on Friday, Dlomo said.

- Grim reminder of HIV -

But for Moshone who has lived in the area for 26 years, the trickle of people is no surprise.

It reminds him of the early 1990s when HIV first emerged in the country, which now has the world's highest HIV prevalence rate.

"In South Africa, this thing is like HIV because when HIV started here... we didn't take it seriously until we saw people dying," he said.

But Dlomo is hopeful that visibility of heath care workers in communities will push people to realise "that this thing is serious and they need to take precautions".

World Health Organisation technical officer Mary Stephen told AFP that based on how the virus has spread through other countries, governments are urged to scale up public awareness, surveillance and medical care.

South Africa's public National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) has secured 67 mobile vans to ramp up testing across the country.

Currently the state will be able to carry out 5,000 tests in 24 hours at 10 laboratories countrywide, but at full capacity it can process 30,000 tests each day.

The country is currently observing a 21-day lockdown patrolled by the police and military, a perfect time to carry out the mobile testing, according to the health minister.

But the lockdown is little respected in the densely-populated Yeoville.

"They don't want to isolate themselves inside their houses. They come out with their kids, they don't care," said Masechaba Motaung, pointing at a busy street.

"They take this virus as if there is nothing happening."

Police have used rubber bullets, teargas and whips to force people to maintain social distancing and force people back into their homes.
Source
South African public healthcare workers dispersed into the buzzing streets of Johannesburg's Yeoville neighbourhood as Africa's worst virus-hit country rolled out mass door-to-door testing for COVID-19.

Armed with screening questionnaires and testing kits, medics and volunteers set up their testing station on the front porch of a block of flats in the gritty business neighbourhood.

Nurse Xola Dlomo told AFP they were asking one resident to mobilise fellow flat dwellers to come for screening and tests.

"They've been coming for screening and they are even open to testing if they have symptoms," Dlomo said.

Already in a 21-day lockdown, South Africa is now embarking on the widespread testing and quarantine campaign involving some 10,000 field workers who are being sent out into homes in villages, towns and cities to screen for symptoms.

The testing plan to break the chain of infection appears to be modelled on the South Korean strategy which saw the Asian country bring the outbreak under control.

South Africa has so far reported nine deaths and 1,585 infections, but Health Minister Zweli Mkhize has warned that the relatively small growth in numbers was perhaps "the calm before a heavy and devastating storm".

In Yeoville -- a crime-prone area in Johannesburg's hardscrabble central business district -- eight small groups have been dispatched across an area covering one square kilometre.

"The health of our people is our first consideration," said Kegorapetse Ndingandinga, overseeing the Yeoville team.

- Scaling up testing -

With his head tilted back, 58-year-old Michael Moshone, braced for his nasal swab, seated on a brick staircase in Yeoville.

"It is a little bit uncomfortable but you've got to be strong... because you want to know exactly what is going on with you," Moshone, wrapped in a green, gold and black scarf, said after his sample was taken.

Before the rollout of mass screening and testing, more than 47,500 tests had been performed, 6,000 of them at public health centres.

But for the heath minister, that number is too low for a country of 57 million people where several million have underlying conditions such as HIV and TB.

The turnout was slow on the first day on Friday, Dlomo said.

- Grim reminder of HIV -

But for Moshone who has lived in the area for 26 years, the trickle of people is no surprise.

It reminds him of the early 1990s when HIV first emerged in the country, which now has the world's highest HIV prevalence rate.

"In South Africa, this thing is like HIV because when HIV started here... we didn't take it seriously until we saw people dying," he said.

But Dlomo is hopeful that visibility of heath care workers in communities will push people to realise "that this thing is serious and they need to take precautions".

World Health Organisation technical officer Mary Stephen told AFP that based on how the virus has spread through other countries, governments are urged to scale up public awareness, surveillance and medical care.

South Africa's public National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) has secured 67 mobile vans to ramp up testing across the country.

Currently the state will be able to carry out 5,000 tests in 24 hours at 10 laboratories countrywide, but at full capacity it can process 30,000 tests each day.

The country is currently observing a 21-day lockdown patrolled by the police and military, a perfect time to carry out the mobile testing, according to the health minister.

But the lockdown is little respected in the densely-populated Yeoville.

"They don't want to isolate themselves inside their houses. They come out with their kids, they don't care," said Masechaba Motaung, pointing at a busy street.

"They take this virus as if there is nothing happening."

Police have used rubber bullets, teargas and whips to force people to maintain social distancing and force people back into their homes.
Source

South Africa now has 1 505 confirmed cases of coronavirus, 2 more die in KZN

South Africa now has 1 505 confirmed cases of coronavirus, 2 more die in KZN

As of Friday 3rd April 2020, the number of coronavirus cases broke the 1 500 mark, rising to 1 505. There are seven confirmed deaths, and two more deaths in KwaZulu-Natal awaiting confirmation on links to Covid-19.

SA government has appointed retired Constitutional Court Judge Justice Kate O'Regan to oversee the tracking and tracing of people using their cell phone numbers. Three patients at St Augustine’s Hospital in Durban are believed to have died from the coronavirus, and the hospital has shut down its emergency ward after 11 staff members tested positive for the virus.

South Africans appear to be heeding the call to stay indoors. Fin24 reports that there is a steep decline in the number of people moving around cities in the wake of the announcement of a 21-day lockdown, according to data by Google.
As of Friday 3rd April 2020, the number of coronavirus cases broke the 1 500 mark, rising to 1 505. There are seven confirmed deaths, and two more deaths in KwaZulu-Natal awaiting confirmation on links to Covid-19.

SA government has appointed retired Constitutional Court Judge Justice Kate O'Regan to oversee the tracking and tracing of people using their cell phone numbers. Three patients at St Augustine’s Hospital in Durban are believed to have died from the coronavirus, and the hospital has shut down its emergency ward after 11 staff members tested positive for the virus.

South Africans appear to be heeding the call to stay indoors. Fin24 reports that there is a steep decline in the number of people moving around cities in the wake of the announcement of a 21-day lockdown, according to data by Google.

South Africa records first two coronavirus deaths as infections top 1,000

South Africa records first two coronavirus deaths as infections top 1,000

US now has more COVID-19 infections than any other country

Russia orders cafes to close nationwide from Saturday


China closes borders; UK records biggest daily rise in deaths; South Africa enters military-patrolled lockdown as the country recorded first two coronavirus deaths and infections top 1,000.

South Africa came under a nationwide military-patrolled lockdown on Friday, joining other African countries imposing strict curfews and shutdowns in an attempt to halt the spread of the coronavirus across the continent.

Some 57 million people are to be restricted to their homes during South Africa’s three-week total lockdown which began at midnight.

In Nigeria, the most populous black country, stringent measures have been put in place to control and stop the spread of the virus as many states of the federation closed borders, band public gathering and markets including religion congregations as the confirmed cases rose to 51 on Thursday and one fatality recorded so far. Civil servant have been ordered to stay at home in many states.

High profile individuals close to the Nigerian president, Major Gen. Muhammadu Buhari are believed to have contacted the pandemic virus as more than eight ministers are reportedly been quarantine but Vice President Yemi Osinbajo has been tested negative.

Meanwhile, for the pandemic to have been recorded in Lagos, West  African countries must be up with more stringent measures to contain the spread of the virus for the region not be  the worst hit with many cases and fatalities more than any at the end of the day as Lagos is home to all and beyond counties in west African sub-region.

Elsewhere, American President Donald Trump and Chinese president Xi Jinping held a phone call, during which Xi warned that the US must take ‘substantive actions’ to improve relations, Chinese state media reported.

After the call Trump tweeted that the conversation was “very good” and that: “China has been through much & has developed a strong understanding of the Virus. We are working closely together.”

Authorities in China will temporarily bar the entry of almost all foreigners and drastically reduce flights to the country as it tries to head off this second wave of infections caused by travellers coming from abroad.

The US has the highest number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the world. Johns Hopkins University suggests the US now has more suspected and confirmed cases of Covid-19 than China, with 85,991 reported in the US and 81,872 in China. Italy is third with 80,589.

Russia has ordered the nationwide closure of cafes. Moscow will close cafes, shops, parks and other non-essential services for one week starting Saturday, its mayor said Thursday, in an "unprecedented" move to fight the spread of coronavirus.

President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday announced a non-working week from March 28 to April 5 to keep Russians at home. But the measures imposed by Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin take the president's measures a step further.

In Russia, a total of 840 cases have been recorded nationwide, according to official statistics on Thursday and one fatality in Moscow was recorded.
The death toll from the coronavirus pandemic sweeping the globe could hit 1.8 million worldwide this year even with swift and stringent measures to stop it, according to a study from Britain’s Imperial College published Thursday.

The global number of confirmed cases of coronavirus has passed 532,000, according to the latest figures on the Johns Hopkins University global dashboard. The latest number of confirmed deaths worldwide was 24,072.

US now has more COVID-19 infections than any other country

Russia orders cafes to close nationwide from Saturday


China closes borders; UK records biggest daily rise in deaths; South Africa enters military-patrolled lockdown as the country recorded first two coronavirus deaths and infections top 1,000.

South Africa came under a nationwide military-patrolled lockdown on Friday, joining other African countries imposing strict curfews and shutdowns in an attempt to halt the spread of the coronavirus across the continent.

Some 57 million people are to be restricted to their homes during South Africa’s three-week total lockdown which began at midnight.

In Nigeria, the most populous black country, stringent measures have been put in place to control and stop the spread of the virus as many states of the federation closed borders, band public gathering and markets including religion congregations as the confirmed cases rose to 51 on Thursday and one fatality recorded so far. Civil servant have been ordered to stay at home in many states.

High profile individuals close to the Nigerian president, Major Gen. Muhammadu Buhari are believed to have contacted the pandemic virus as more than eight ministers are reportedly been quarantine but Vice President Yemi Osinbajo has been tested negative.

Meanwhile, for the pandemic to have been recorded in Lagos, West  African countries must be up with more stringent measures to contain the spread of the virus for the region not be  the worst hit with many cases and fatalities more than any at the end of the day as Lagos is home to all and beyond counties in west African sub-region.

Elsewhere, American President Donald Trump and Chinese president Xi Jinping held a phone call, during which Xi warned that the US must take ‘substantive actions’ to improve relations, Chinese state media reported.

After the call Trump tweeted that the conversation was “very good” and that: “China has been through much & has developed a strong understanding of the Virus. We are working closely together.”

Authorities in China will temporarily bar the entry of almost all foreigners and drastically reduce flights to the country as it tries to head off this second wave of infections caused by travellers coming from abroad.

The US has the highest number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the world. Johns Hopkins University suggests the US now has more suspected and confirmed cases of Covid-19 than China, with 85,991 reported in the US and 81,872 in China. Italy is third with 80,589.

Russia has ordered the nationwide closure of cafes. Moscow will close cafes, shops, parks and other non-essential services for one week starting Saturday, its mayor said Thursday, in an "unprecedented" move to fight the spread of coronavirus.

President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday announced a non-working week from March 28 to April 5 to keep Russians at home. But the measures imposed by Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin take the president's measures a step further.

In Russia, a total of 840 cases have been recorded nationwide, according to official statistics on Thursday and one fatality in Moscow was recorded.
The death toll from the coronavirus pandemic sweeping the globe could hit 1.8 million worldwide this year even with swift and stringent measures to stop it, according to a study from Britain’s Imperial College published Thursday.

The global number of confirmed cases of coronavirus has passed 532,000, according to the latest figures on the Johns Hopkins University global dashboard. The latest number of confirmed deaths worldwide was 24,072.

COVID-19: Death toll in Africa reaches 17 in 24 hours – WHO

COVID-19: Death toll in Africa reaches 17 in 24 hours – WHO

The UN health agency has said on Wednesday that there 633 confirmed COVID-19 cases in 33 African countries with 17 death toll so far.

In the past 24 hours, Africa has recorded 17 deaths from the ongoing Covid-19 outbreak, the World Health Organisation (WHO), Africa region has said. While Africa was among the last continent to report cases of the virus, cases are beginning to spread throughout the continent as 33 countries have reported at least a case of the disease.

Also in the past 24 hours, the Gambia, Mauritius and Zambia have announced first cases, but these cases in Africa have remained low compared to other continents.

Egypt still tops the chart of countries with the most cases in Africa with 210 cases. This is followed by South Africa with 116 and Algeria with 75 confirmed cases while the number of confirmed cases in Nigeria has increased to eight.

As for Nigeria, more cases might be expected from the country as contact tracing has been intensified to get the people who have been in contact with the confirmed cases.

As African countries are bracing up to tackle the rising cases, WHO said it is supporting countries with surveillance, diagnostics and treatment.

Globally, cases have continued to soar as Europe is now the epicenter for the outbreak while cases have slowed down in China where the virus originated from as the country records lower index cases.

The total fatalities recorded in Europe has surpassed that of Asia while China still tops the chart of countries with the most infected cases and deaths globally with over 80,500 infected people and over 3,000 deaths.

This is followed closely with Italy which has so far reported over 35,000 cases and 2, 978 deaths.

As at Thursday, 6:51 GMT, a total of 219,385 confirmed cases have been reported in 176 countries with 8,749 deaths globally.

Iran, South Korea and Spain are also in the worst hit list of the global pandemic.

Testing and isolation

Despite the grim, people have been recovering from the virus. Over 85,000 people have been treated, recovered and discharged from the hospital.

In all these, WHO Director-General, Tedros Ghebreyesus, has insisted that the pandemic can still be controlled if governments show more dedication.

He said the first vaccine trial has begun just 60 days after the genetic sequence of the coronavirus was shared, but countries should not relent in isolation and treatment of confirmed cases.

He said “WHO continues to recommend that isolating, testing and treating every suspected Covid-19 case, and tracing every contact, must be the backbone of the response in every country.

He said that is the best hope of preventing widespread community transmission.

Mr Ghebreyesus also recommended that wherever possible, confirmed mild Covid-19 cases should be isolated in health facilities, where trained professionals can provide good medical care, and prevent clinical progression and onward transmission.

“If that’s not possible, countries can use community facilities to isolate and care for mild Covid-19 cases and refer them for specialized care quickly if needed”, he said.
The UN health agency has said on Wednesday that there 633 confirmed COVID-19 cases in 33 African countries with 17 death toll so far.

In the past 24 hours, Africa has recorded 17 deaths from the ongoing Covid-19 outbreak, the World Health Organisation (WHO), Africa region has said. While Africa was among the last continent to report cases of the virus, cases are beginning to spread throughout the continent as 33 countries have reported at least a case of the disease.

Also in the past 24 hours, the Gambia, Mauritius and Zambia have announced first cases, but these cases in Africa have remained low compared to other continents.

Egypt still tops the chart of countries with the most cases in Africa with 210 cases. This is followed by South Africa with 116 and Algeria with 75 confirmed cases while the number of confirmed cases in Nigeria has increased to eight.

As for Nigeria, more cases might be expected from the country as contact tracing has been intensified to get the people who have been in contact with the confirmed cases.

As African countries are bracing up to tackle the rising cases, WHO said it is supporting countries with surveillance, diagnostics and treatment.

Globally, cases have continued to soar as Europe is now the epicenter for the outbreak while cases have slowed down in China where the virus originated from as the country records lower index cases.

The total fatalities recorded in Europe has surpassed that of Asia while China still tops the chart of countries with the most infected cases and deaths globally with over 80,500 infected people and over 3,000 deaths.

This is followed closely with Italy which has so far reported over 35,000 cases and 2, 978 deaths.

As at Thursday, 6:51 GMT, a total of 219,385 confirmed cases have been reported in 176 countries with 8,749 deaths globally.

Iran, South Korea and Spain are also in the worst hit list of the global pandemic.

Testing and isolation

Despite the grim, people have been recovering from the virus. Over 85,000 people have been treated, recovered and discharged from the hospital.

In all these, WHO Director-General, Tedros Ghebreyesus, has insisted that the pandemic can still be controlled if governments show more dedication.

He said the first vaccine trial has begun just 60 days after the genetic sequence of the coronavirus was shared, but countries should not relent in isolation and treatment of confirmed cases.

He said “WHO continues to recommend that isolating, testing and treating every suspected Covid-19 case, and tracing every contact, must be the backbone of the response in every country.

He said that is the best hope of preventing widespread community transmission.

Mr Ghebreyesus also recommended that wherever possible, confirmed mild Covid-19 cases should be isolated in health facilities, where trained professionals can provide good medical care, and prevent clinical progression and onward transmission.

“If that’s not possible, countries can use community facilities to isolate and care for mild Covid-19 cases and refer them for specialized care quickly if needed”, he said.

U.S. Government Contributes toward Coronavirus COVID-19 Awareness Response in South Africa

U.S. Government Contributes toward Coronavirus COVID-19 Awareness Response in South Africa

The United States government, through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), is committing approximately 8 million rand ($500,000) in financing to support the Government of South Africa’s Risk Communication and Community Engagement plan in the response to the coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. According to Press release by the US Embassy in South Africa.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), risk communication and community engagement is an essential component of health emergency readiness and response activities. USAID is partnering with Breakthrough ACTION and the Centre for Communication Impact (CCI), a South African non-profit organization with expertise in strategic communication and community response activities. Expected activities include public communication, disinformation control, and strengthening social mobilization and community engagement.

USAID South Africa financing is from the Emergency Reserve Fund for Contagious Infectious Diseases at USAID. USAID Administrator Mark Green committed $37 million dollars for 25 countries affected by novel coronavirus COVID-19 or at high risk of its spread. Other recipients of these funds include the World Health Organization, multilateral institutions, and programs led by USAID’s implementing partners across the 25 countries. These are the first U.S. government funds committed from the pledge of up to $100 million in COVID-19 response funding announced by the U.S. Department of State on February 7, 2020.
The United States government, through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), is committing approximately 8 million rand ($500,000) in financing to support the Government of South Africa’s Risk Communication and Community Engagement plan in the response to the coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. According to Press release by the US Embassy in South Africa.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), risk communication and community engagement is an essential component of health emergency readiness and response activities. USAID is partnering with Breakthrough ACTION and the Centre for Communication Impact (CCI), a South African non-profit organization with expertise in strategic communication and community response activities. Expected activities include public communication, disinformation control, and strengthening social mobilization and community engagement.

USAID South Africa financing is from the Emergency Reserve Fund for Contagious Infectious Diseases at USAID. USAID Administrator Mark Green committed $37 million dollars for 25 countries affected by novel coronavirus COVID-19 or at high risk of its spread. Other recipients of these funds include the World Health Organization, multilateral institutions, and programs led by USAID’s implementing partners across the 25 countries. These are the first U.S. government funds committed from the pledge of up to $100 million in COVID-19 response funding announced by the U.S. Department of State on February 7, 2020.

COVID-19: Saudi Arabia confirms four more cases

COVID-19: Saudi Arabia confirms four more cases

Number of coronavirus cases in South Africa rises to three 

In the Arab world, Saudi Arabia's health ministry registered four new cases of the coronavirus, bringing the total number of infections to 11 as the Kingdom also separately announced a general amnesty for those who violate a travel ban to Iran. 
So far, 125 people have come forward. 

While in Africa, the wife of the first patient to be infected with the coronavirus has tested positive for the virus, South Africa's health ministry said in a statement, bringing the number of confirmed cases to three.

To date, all three confirmed cases belonged to a group of 10 tourists who travelled to Italy, according to the statement.

All those who may have come into contact with the infected individuals have been traced, except for one person who was not in South Africa.

Number of coronavirus cases in South Africa rises to three 

In the Arab world, Saudi Arabia's health ministry registered four new cases of the coronavirus, bringing the total number of infections to 11 as the Kingdom also separately announced a general amnesty for those who violate a travel ban to Iran. 
So far, 125 people have come forward. 

While in Africa, the wife of the first patient to be infected with the coronavirus has tested positive for the virus, South Africa's health ministry said in a statement, bringing the number of confirmed cases to three.

To date, all three confirmed cases belonged to a group of 10 tourists who travelled to Italy, according to the statement.

All those who may have come into contact with the infected individuals have been traced, except for one person who was not in South Africa.

South Africa confirms first case of coronavirus

South Africa confirms first case of coronavirus

Another African Country 'South Africa' confirmed its first case of coronavirus in the country onn Thursday, according to the Health Ministry statement.

Health Minister Zweli Mkhize said in a statement that the patient is a 38-year-old male who travelled to Italy with his wife. The couple returned to South Africa on March 1 and the patient consulted a private practitioner two days later with symptoms of fever, headache, malaise, a sore throat and a cough.

The patient has been in isolation since then as well as the doctor.
Another African Country 'South Africa' confirmed its first case of coronavirus in the country onn Thursday, according to the Health Ministry statement.

Health Minister Zweli Mkhize said in a statement that the patient is a 38-year-old male who travelled to Italy with his wife. The couple returned to South Africa on March 1 and the patient consulted a private practitioner two days later with symptoms of fever, headache, malaise, a sore throat and a cough.

The patient has been in isolation since then as well as the doctor.

Poster Speaks

Poster Speaks/box

Trending

randomposts