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Showing posts with label twitter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label twitter. Show all posts

The SEV that took down all our services was the worst outage we've had in years - Mark Zuckerberg

The SEV that took down all our services was the worst outage we've had in years - Mark Zuckerberg

I wanted to share a note I wrote to everyone at our company.


---


Hey everyone: it's been quite a week, and I wanted to share some thoughts with all of you.








First, the SEV that took down all our services yesterday was the worst outage we've had in years. We've spent the past 24 hours debriefing how we can strengthen our systems against this kind of failure. This was also a reminder of how much our work matters to people. The deeper concern with an outage like this isn't how many people switch to competitive services or how much money we lose, but what it means for the people who rely on our services to communicate with loved ones, run their businesses, or support their communities.


Second, now that today's testimony is over, I wanted to reflect on the public debate we're in. I'm sure many of you have found the recent coverage hard to read because it just doesn't reflect the company we know. We care deeply about issues like safety, well-being and mental health. It's difficult to see coverage that misrepresents our work and our motives. At the most basic level, I think most of us just don't recognize the false picture of the company that is being painted.


Many of the claims don't make any sense. If we wanted to ignore research, why would we create an industry-leading research program to understand these important issues in the first place? If we didn't care about fighting harmful content, then why would we employ so many more people dedicated to this than any other company in our space -- even ones larger than us? If we wanted to hide our results, why would we have established an industry-leading standard for transparency and reporting on what we're doing? And if social media were as responsible for polarizing society as some people claim, then why are we seeing polarization increase in the US while it stays flat or declines in many countries with just as heavy use of social media around the world?


At the heart of these accusations is this idea that we prioritize profit over safety and well-being. That's just not true. For example, one move that has been called into question is when we introduced the Meaningful Social Interactions change to News Feed. This change showed fewer viral videos and more content from friends and family -- which we did knowing it would mean people spent less time on Facebook, but that research suggested it was the right thing for people's well-being. Is that something a company focused on profits over people would do?


The argument that we deliberately push content that makes people angry for profit is deeply illogical. We make money from ads, and advertisers consistently tell us they don't want their ads next to harmful or angry content. And I don't know any tech company that sets out to build products that make people angry or depressed. The moral, business and product incentives all point in the opposite direction.


But of everything published, I'm particularly focused on the questions raised about our work with kids. I've spent a lot of time reflecting on the kinds of experiences I want my kids and others to have online, and it's very important to me that everything we build is safe and good for kids.


The reality is that young people use technology. Think about how many school-age kids have phones. Rather than ignoring this, technology companies should build experiences that meet their needs while also keeping them safe. We're deeply committed to doing industry-leading work in this area. A good example of this work is Messenger Kids, which is widely recognized as better and safer than alternatives.


We've also worked on bringing this kind of age-appropriate experience with parental controls for Instagram too. But given all the questions about whether this would actually be better for kids, we've paused that project to take more time to engage with experts and make sure anything we do would be helpful.


Like many of you, I found it difficult to read the mischaracterization of the research into how Instagram affects young people. As we wrote in our Newsroom post explaining this: "The research actually demonstrated that many teens we heard from feel that using Instagram helps them when they are struggling with the kinds of hard moments and issues teenagers have always faced. In fact, in 11 of 12 areas on the slide referenced by the Journal -- including serious areas like loneliness, anxiety, sadness and eating issues -- more teenage girls who said they struggled with that issue also said Instagram made those difficult times better rather than worse."


But when it comes to young people's health or well-being, every negative experience matters. It is incredibly sad to think of a young person in a moment of distress who, instead of being comforted, has their experience made worse. We have worked for years on industry-leading efforts to help people in these moments and I'm proud of the work we've done. We constantly use our research to improve this work further.


Similar to balancing other social issues, I don't believe private companies should make all of the decisions on their own. That's why we have advocated for updated internet regulations for several years now. I have testified in Congress multiple times and asked them to update these regulations. I've written op-eds outlining the areas of regulation we think are most important related to elections, harmful content, privacy, and competition.


We're committed to doing the best work we can, but at some level the right body to assess tradeoffs between social equities is our democratically elected Congress. For example, what is the right age for teens to be able to use internet services? How should internet services verify people's ages? And how should companies balance teens' privacy while giving parents visibility into their activity?


If we're going to have an informed conversation about the effects of social media on young people, it's important to start with a full picture. We're committed to doing more research ourselves and making more research publicly available.


That said, I'm worried about the incentives that are being set here. We have an industry-leading research program so that we can identify important issues and work on them. It's disheartening to see that work taken out of context and used to construct a false narrative that we don't care. If we attack organizations making an effort to study their impact on the world, we're effectively sending the message that it's safer not to look at all, in case you find something that could be held against you. That's the conclusion other companies seem to have reached, and I think that leads to a place that would be far worse for society. Even though it might be easier for us to follow that path, we're going to keep doing research because it's the right thing to do.


I know it's frustrating to see the good work we do get mischaracterized, especially for those of you who are making important contributions across safety, integrity, research and product. But I believe that over the long term if we keep trying to do what's right and delivering experiences that improve people's lives, it will be better for our community and our business. I've asked leaders across the company to do deep dives on our work across many areas over the next few days so you can see everything that we're doing to get there.


When I reflect on our work, I think about the real impact we have on the world -- the people who can now stay in touch with their loved ones, create opportunities to support themselves, and find community. This is why billions of people love our products. I'm proud of everything we do to keep building the best social products in the world and grateful to all of you for the work you do here every day.

I wanted to share a note I wrote to everyone at our company.


---


Hey everyone: it's been quite a week, and I wanted to share some thoughts with all of you.








First, the SEV that took down all our services yesterday was the worst outage we've had in years. We've spent the past 24 hours debriefing how we can strengthen our systems against this kind of failure. This was also a reminder of how much our work matters to people. The deeper concern with an outage like this isn't how many people switch to competitive services or how much money we lose, but what it means for the people who rely on our services to communicate with loved ones, run their businesses, or support their communities.


Second, now that today's testimony is over, I wanted to reflect on the public debate we're in. I'm sure many of you have found the recent coverage hard to read because it just doesn't reflect the company we know. We care deeply about issues like safety, well-being and mental health. It's difficult to see coverage that misrepresents our work and our motives. At the most basic level, I think most of us just don't recognize the false picture of the company that is being painted.


Many of the claims don't make any sense. If we wanted to ignore research, why would we create an industry-leading research program to understand these important issues in the first place? If we didn't care about fighting harmful content, then why would we employ so many more people dedicated to this than any other company in our space -- even ones larger than us? If we wanted to hide our results, why would we have established an industry-leading standard for transparency and reporting on what we're doing? And if social media were as responsible for polarizing society as some people claim, then why are we seeing polarization increase in the US while it stays flat or declines in many countries with just as heavy use of social media around the world?


At the heart of these accusations is this idea that we prioritize profit over safety and well-being. That's just not true. For example, one move that has been called into question is when we introduced the Meaningful Social Interactions change to News Feed. This change showed fewer viral videos and more content from friends and family -- which we did knowing it would mean people spent less time on Facebook, but that research suggested it was the right thing for people's well-being. Is that something a company focused on profits over people would do?


The argument that we deliberately push content that makes people angry for profit is deeply illogical. We make money from ads, and advertisers consistently tell us they don't want their ads next to harmful or angry content. And I don't know any tech company that sets out to build products that make people angry or depressed. The moral, business and product incentives all point in the opposite direction.


But of everything published, I'm particularly focused on the questions raised about our work with kids. I've spent a lot of time reflecting on the kinds of experiences I want my kids and others to have online, and it's very important to me that everything we build is safe and good for kids.


The reality is that young people use technology. Think about how many school-age kids have phones. Rather than ignoring this, technology companies should build experiences that meet their needs while also keeping them safe. We're deeply committed to doing industry-leading work in this area. A good example of this work is Messenger Kids, which is widely recognized as better and safer than alternatives.


We've also worked on bringing this kind of age-appropriate experience with parental controls for Instagram too. But given all the questions about whether this would actually be better for kids, we've paused that project to take more time to engage with experts and make sure anything we do would be helpful.


Like many of you, I found it difficult to read the mischaracterization of the research into how Instagram affects young people. As we wrote in our Newsroom post explaining this: "The research actually demonstrated that many teens we heard from feel that using Instagram helps them when they are struggling with the kinds of hard moments and issues teenagers have always faced. In fact, in 11 of 12 areas on the slide referenced by the Journal -- including serious areas like loneliness, anxiety, sadness and eating issues -- more teenage girls who said they struggled with that issue also said Instagram made those difficult times better rather than worse."


But when it comes to young people's health or well-being, every negative experience matters. It is incredibly sad to think of a young person in a moment of distress who, instead of being comforted, has their experience made worse. We have worked for years on industry-leading efforts to help people in these moments and I'm proud of the work we've done. We constantly use our research to improve this work further.


Similar to balancing other social issues, I don't believe private companies should make all of the decisions on their own. That's why we have advocated for updated internet regulations for several years now. I have testified in Congress multiple times and asked them to update these regulations. I've written op-eds outlining the areas of regulation we think are most important related to elections, harmful content, privacy, and competition.


We're committed to doing the best work we can, but at some level the right body to assess tradeoffs between social equities is our democratically elected Congress. For example, what is the right age for teens to be able to use internet services? How should internet services verify people's ages? And how should companies balance teens' privacy while giving parents visibility into their activity?


If we're going to have an informed conversation about the effects of social media on young people, it's important to start with a full picture. We're committed to doing more research ourselves and making more research publicly available.


That said, I'm worried about the incentives that are being set here. We have an industry-leading research program so that we can identify important issues and work on them. It's disheartening to see that work taken out of context and used to construct a false narrative that we don't care. If we attack organizations making an effort to study their impact on the world, we're effectively sending the message that it's safer not to look at all, in case you find something that could be held against you. That's the conclusion other companies seem to have reached, and I think that leads to a place that would be far worse for society. Even though it might be easier for us to follow that path, we're going to keep doing research because it's the right thing to do.


I know it's frustrating to see the good work we do get mischaracterized, especially for those of you who are making important contributions across safety, integrity, research and product. But I believe that over the long term if we keep trying to do what's right and delivering experiences that improve people's lives, it will be better for our community and our business. I've asked leaders across the company to do deep dives on our work across many areas over the next few days so you can see everything that we're doing to get there.


When I reflect on our work, I think about the real impact we have on the world -- the people who can now stay in touch with their loved ones, create opportunities to support themselves, and find community. This is why billions of people love our products. I'm proud of everything we do to keep building the best social products in the world and grateful to all of you for the work you do here every day.

End Twitter suspension and violations of the right to Freedom of expression

End Twitter suspension and violations of the right to Freedom of expression



Dear President, Major Gen. Muhammadu Buhari,

Dear Attorney General of the Federation, Abubarka Malami




Nigerian authorities have unlawfully suspended access to Twitter for millions of Nigerians. They even directed Media houses to deactivate their Twitter accounts. Those actions are clear violations of the right to freedom of expression, access to information, and freedom of the press.

I call on you to ensure that access to Twitter is unimpeded and that no other restrictions are put in place to hinder access to any social media.

When in the streets, peaceful protesters are met with violent reprisal from the Nigerian authorities. Now their online voices have been silenced as well.




I urge you to guarantee the right to freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom.



Nigerians’ voices matter.




Sincerely,

Oludele Abiola



You too can sign and share this letter!


Buhari & Malami

EMAIL PRESIDENT MUHAMMADU BUHARI AND ATTORNEY GENERAL ABUBAKAR MALAMI

Your email will go directly to their inboxes from the email address you provide. 







Dear President, Major Gen. Muhammadu Buhari,

Dear Attorney General of the Federation, Abubarka Malami




Nigerian authorities have unlawfully suspended access to Twitter for millions of Nigerians. They even directed Media houses to deactivate their Twitter accounts. Those actions are clear violations of the right to freedom of expression, access to information, and freedom of the press.

I call on you to ensure that access to Twitter is unimpeded and that no other restrictions are put in place to hinder access to any social media.

When in the streets, peaceful protesters are met with violent reprisal from the Nigerian authorities. Now their online voices have been silenced as well.




I urge you to guarantee the right to freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom.



Nigerians’ voices matter.




Sincerely,

Oludele Abiola



You too can sign and share this letter!


Buhari & Malami

EMAIL PRESIDENT MUHAMMADU BUHARI AND ATTORNEY GENERAL ABUBAKAR MALAMI

Your email will go directly to their inboxes from the email address you provide. 





AGF MALAMI violated the TWITTER BAN order, Uses VPN to deactivate his account

AGF MALAMI violated the TWITTER BAN order, Uses VPN to deactivate his account

Let's call our politicians, Buhari MUST NOT call out the Army it will back fire


THE TRAP HAS CATCH THE HUNTER!


AGF MALAMI violated the TWITTER BAN order by using VPN to deactivate his account.


BUHARI'S AGF MALAMI MUST FACE THE LAW FIRST BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO PROSECUTE ANY NIGERIAN FOR USING TWITTER .


Join the June 12 Protest to say No to DOUBLE STANDARD AND MEDIOCRITY 


#June12Protest #BuhariMustGo #RevolutionNow


That's Lai Mohammed number, let's show him love as well...

08034301111


Amb. Hussain Coomassie, the man that told Buhari to force Military on protesters. He promised war against us if the military fails. Let's show him some love and prayers ... His phone number - 08032297457


Let’s start greeting our leaders

(Our mumu don do!)


+234 802 778 0800

Vice President


Make them advise the president to do the needful.

It's their private line.

(Make we ring them for 24hours)


Senate president

NASS

+234 806 330 9110


Dsp Omo agege

+234 703 339 9937


Tinubu

+2348062240104


Start occupying this numbers


Presidential spokesman Femi adesina

0802 314 5926

Occupy


All numbers sent are genuine contacts of your representative.

We elected them

As our representatives and they are answerable to us.

Keep calling them


Let's call our politicians . The President MUST NOT call out the Army it will back fire 


*Below are the contact details of the 109 Senators. Don't just retweet, but also take action. Send an email! Send text messages! Call them! Tell your friends and families to do the same! TALK TO YOUR SENATORS!*

Share your perception about the social media bill and that of the Hate Speech. 


ABIA

Sen. E. Abaribe

08033129452 | [email protected]


Sen. O. Kalu

08034000001 | [email protected]


Sen. T. Orji

07082800000 | [email protected]


ADAMAWA


Sen. B. Yaroe

08034050460 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Abbo

08066285112 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Ahmed

[email protected]


AKWA IBOM


Sen. B. Akpan

08055555188 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Eyakenyi

08035054282 | [email protected]


Sen. C. Ekpeyong

08027785234 | [email protected]


ANAMBRA

Sen. I. Ubah

09096655596 | [email protected]


Sen. E. Uche

08037620002 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Oduah

08055084340 | [email protected]


Bauchi Central

Sen. H. Jika

08038666690 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Bulkachuwa

[email protected]


Sen. L. Gamau

[email protected]


BAYELSA

Sen. O. EWHRUDJAKPO

09031352791 | [email protected]


Sen. D. Diri

08036668698 | [email protected]


Sen. D. Wangagra

[email protected]


BENUE

Sen. E. Orker-Jev

[email protected]


Sen A. Morro

08068870606 | [email protected]


BORNO

Sen. A. Kyari

[email protected]


Sen. K. Shettima

08034459047 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Ndume

08109480004 | [email protected]


CROSS RIVER

Sen. R. Oko

[email protected]


Sen. G. Bassey

08034444555 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Onor

08030998460 | [email protected]


DELTA

Sen. O. Omo-Agege

07033399937 | [email protected]


Sen. J. Manager

08143103829 | [email protected]


Sen. P. Nwaoboshi

08037200999 | [email protected]


EDO

Sen. C. Ordia

08038403877 | [email protected]


Sen. F. Alimikhena

08155555884 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Urhoghide

08033855557 | [email protected]


EKITI

Sen. A. Adeyeye

08023051100 | [email protected]


Sen. O. Adetumbi

08064487689 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Bamidele

080911112 | [email protected]


ENUGU

Sen. C. Nnamani

08022255522 | [email protected]


Sen. Ikweremadu

08075757000 | [email protected]  


Sen. C. Utazi

[email protected]


GOMBE

Sen. A. Kilawangs

[email protected]


Sen. D. Mohammed

07068686699 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Alkali

08026032222 | [email protected]


EBONYI

Sen. S. Egwu

08039665848 | [email protected]


Sen. J. Ogba

08037791346 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Nnachi

08034528595 | [email protected]


IMO

Sen. E. Onyewuchi

08032012132 | [email protected]


Sen. R. Okorocha

[email protected]


Sen. B. Uwajumogu

[email protected]


JIGAWA

Sen. D. Sankara

08037032577 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Mohammed

08022902648 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Hadejia

[email protected]


KADUNA

Sen. S. Kwari

08033019005 | [email protected]


Sen. D. La'ah

08118887772 | [email protected]


KANO

Sen. K. Gaya

[email protected]


Sen. I. Jibrin

[email protected]


Sen. I. Shekarau

08099199111 | [email protected]


KATSINA

Sen. A. Babba-Kaita

[email protected]


Sen. B. Mandiya

[email protected]


Sen. K. Barkiya

08138360742 | [email protected]


KEBBI

Sen. M. Aliero

07066847000 | [email protected]


Sen. Y. Abdullahi

[email protected]


Sen. B. Na'Allah

[email protected]


KOGI

Sen. J. Isah

08185651909 | [email protected]


Sen. O. Yakubu

07032642674 | [email protected]


KWARA

Sen. A. Yisa

07055221111 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Umar

[email protected]


Sen. I. 'Olorigbigbe'

08033581695 | [email protected]


LAGOS

Sen. Oluremi Tinubu

08095300251 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Osinowo

08033049369 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Adeola

08074000040 | [email protected]


NASARAWA

Sen. A. Adamu

[email protected]


Sen. G. Awkashiki

08099321703 | [email protected]


Sen. U. Almakura

08077253989 | [email protected]


NIGER

SEN. ALIYU ABDULLAHI - THE SPONSOR OF THE BILL

08052046555 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Bima

08173479797 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Musa

08033114615 | [email protected]


OGUN

Sen. R. Mustapha

08033047403 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Amosun

08033213993 | [email protected]yahoo.com


Sen. T. Odebiyi

08036058080 | [email protected]


ONDO

Sen. A. Akinyelure

08091707000 | [email protected]


Sen. N. Tofowomo

08054546666 | [email protected]


Sen. R. Boroffice

08176406557 | [email protected]


OSUN

Sen. S. Basiru

08034753343 | [email protected]


Sen. F. Fadahunsi

08052242211 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Oriolowo

08033565979 | [email protected]


OYO

Sen. T. Folarin

08033160587 | [email protected]


Sen. B. Omotayo

08037053375 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Balogun

08132956057 | [email protected]


PLATEAU

Senator I. Longjan

07044442045 | [email protected]


Sen. H. Dimka

08033359443 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Gyang

08097777712 | [email protected]


RIVERS

Sen. B. Apiafi

[email protected]


Sen. G. Sekibo

[email protected]


Sen. B. Mpigi

08037419000 | [email protected]


Let's call our politicians, Buhari MUST NOT call out the Army it will back fire


THE TRAP HAS CATCH THE HUNTER!


AGF MALAMI violated the TWITTER BAN order by using VPN to deactivate his account.


BUHARI'S AGF MALAMI MUST FACE THE LAW FIRST BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO PROSECUTE ANY NIGERIAN FOR USING TWITTER .


Join the June 12 Protest to say No to DOUBLE STANDARD AND MEDIOCRITY 


#June12Protest #BuhariMustGo #RevolutionNow


That's Lai Mohammed number, let's show him love as well...

08034301111


Amb. Hussain Coomassie, the man that told Buhari to force Military on protesters. He promised war against us if the military fails. Let's show him some love and prayers ... His phone number - 08032297457


Let’s start greeting our leaders

(Our mumu don do!)


+234 802 778 0800

Vice President


Make them advise the president to do the needful.

It's their private line.

(Make we ring them for 24hours)


Senate president

NASS

+234 806 330 9110


Dsp Omo agege

+234 703 339 9937


Tinubu

+2348062240104


Start occupying this numbers


Presidential spokesman Femi adesina

0802 314 5926

Occupy


All numbers sent are genuine contacts of your representative.

We elected them

As our representatives and they are answerable to us.

Keep calling them


Let's call our politicians . The President MUST NOT call out the Army it will back fire 


*Below are the contact details of the 109 Senators. Don't just retweet, but also take action. Send an email! Send text messages! Call them! Tell your friends and families to do the same! TALK TO YOUR SENATORS!*

Share your perception about the social media bill and that of the Hate Speech. 


ABIA

Sen. E. Abaribe

08033129452 | [email protected]


Sen. O. Kalu

08034000001 | [email protected]


Sen. T. Orji

07082800000 | [email protected]


ADAMAWA


Sen. B. Yaroe

08034050460 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Abbo

08066285112 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Ahmed

[email protected]


AKWA IBOM


Sen. B. Akpan

08055555188 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Eyakenyi

08035054282 | [email protected]


Sen. C. Ekpeyong

08027785234 | [email protected]


ANAMBRA

Sen. I. Ubah

09096655596 | [email protected]


Sen. E. Uche

08037620002 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Oduah

08055084340 | [email protected]


Bauchi Central

Sen. H. Jika

08038666690 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Bulkachuwa

[email protected]


Sen. L. Gamau

[email protected]


BAYELSA

Sen. O. EWHRUDJAKPO

09031352791 | [email protected]


Sen. D. Diri

08036668698 | [email protected]


Sen. D. Wangagra

[email protected]


BENUE

Sen. E. Orker-Jev

[email protected]


Sen A. Morro

08068870606 | [email protected]


BORNO

Sen. A. Kyari

[email protected]


Sen. K. Shettima

08034459047 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Ndume

08109480004 | [email protected]


CROSS RIVER

Sen. R. Oko

[email protected]


Sen. G. Bassey

08034444555 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Onor

08030998460 | [email protected]


DELTA

Sen. O. Omo-Agege

07033399937 | [email protected]


Sen. J. Manager

08143103829 | [email protected]


Sen. P. Nwaoboshi

08037200999 | [email protected]


EDO

Sen. C. Ordia

08038403877 | [email protected]


Sen. F. Alimikhena

08155555884 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Urhoghide

08033855557 | [email protected]


EKITI

Sen. A. Adeyeye

08023051100 | [email protected]


Sen. O. Adetumbi

08064487689 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Bamidele

080911112 | [email protected]


ENUGU

Sen. C. Nnamani

08022255522 | [email protected]


Sen. Ikweremadu

08075757000 | [email protected]  


Sen. C. Utazi

[email protected]


GOMBE

Sen. A. Kilawangs

[email protected]


Sen. D. Mohammed

07068686699 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Alkali

08026032222 | [email protected]


EBONYI

Sen. S. Egwu

08039665848 | [email protected]


Sen. J. Ogba

08037791346 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Nnachi

08034528595 | [email protected]


IMO

Sen. E. Onyewuchi

08032012132 | [email protected]


Sen. R. Okorocha

[email protected]


Sen. B. Uwajumogu

[email protected]


JIGAWA

Sen. D. Sankara

08037032577 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Mohammed

08022902648 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Hadejia

[email protected]


KADUNA

Sen. S. Kwari

08033019005 | [email protected]


Sen. D. La'ah

08118887772 | [email protected]


KANO

Sen. K. Gaya

[email protected]


Sen. I. Jibrin

[email protected]


Sen. I. Shekarau

08099199111 | [email protected]


KATSINA

Sen. A. Babba-Kaita

[email protected]


Sen. B. Mandiya

[email protected]


Sen. K. Barkiya

08138360742 | [email protected]


KEBBI

Sen. M. Aliero

07066847000 | [email protected]


Sen. Y. Abdullahi

[email protected]


Sen. B. Na'Allah

[email protected]


KOGI

Sen. J. Isah

08185651909 | [email protected]


Sen. O. Yakubu

07032642674 | [email protected]


KWARA

Sen. A. Yisa

07055221111 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Umar

[email protected]


Sen. I. 'Olorigbigbe'

08033581695 | [email protected]


LAGOS

Sen. Oluremi Tinubu

08095300251 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Osinowo

08033049369 | [email protected]


Sen. S. Adeola

08074000040 | [email protected]


NASARAWA

Sen. A. Adamu

[email protected]


Sen. G. Awkashiki

08099321703 | [email protected]


Sen. U. Almakura

08077253989 | [email protected]


NIGER

SEN. ALIYU ABDULLAHI - THE SPONSOR OF THE BILL

08052046555 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Bima

08173479797 | [email protected]


Sen. M. Musa

08033114615 | [email protected]


OGUN

Sen. R. Mustapha

08033047403 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Amosun

08033213993 | [email protected]


Sen. T. Odebiyi

08036058080 | [email protected]


ONDO

Sen. A. Akinyelure

08091707000 | [email protected]


Sen. N. Tofowomo

08054546666 | [email protected]


Sen. R. Boroffice

08176406557 | [email protected]


OSUN

Sen. S. Basiru

08034753343 | [email protected]


Sen. F. Fadahunsi

08052242211 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Oriolowo

08033565979 | [email protected]


OYO

Sen. T. Folarin

08033160587 | [email protected]


Sen. B. Omotayo

08037053375 | [email protected]


Sen. A. Balogun

08132956057 | [email protected]


PLATEAU

Senator I. Longjan

07044442045 | [email protected]


Sen. H. Dimka

08033359443 | [email protected]


Sen. I. Gyang

08097777712 | [email protected]


RIVERS

Sen. B. Apiafi

[email protected]


Sen. G. Sekibo

[email protected]


Sen. B. Mpigi

08037419000 | [email protected]


US Says Buhari's Twitter Ban condemnable

US Says Buhari's Twitter Ban condemnable


The US has said in a statement that Nigeria’s constitution provides for freedom of expression.


The Buhari led dictatorial government’s recent #Twitterban undermines Nigerians’ ability to exercise this fundamental freedom and sends a poor message to its citizens, investors and businesses. Banning social media and curbing every citizen’s ability to seek, receive, and impart information undermines fundamental freedoms. 


According to the the statement: As President Biden has stated, our need for individual expression, open public conversation, and accountability has never been greater. The path to a more secure Nigeria lies in more, not less communication, alongside concerted efforts toward unity, peace, and prosperity.



The US has said in a statement that Nigeria’s constitution provides for freedom of expression.


The Buhari led dictatorial government’s recent #Twitterban undermines Nigerians’ ability to exercise this fundamental freedom and sends a poor message to its citizens, investors and businesses. Banning social media and curbing every citizen’s ability to seek, receive, and impart information undermines fundamental freedoms. 


According to the the statement: As President Biden has stated, our need for individual expression, open public conversation, and accountability has never been greater. The path to a more secure Nigeria lies in more, not less communication, alongside concerted efforts toward unity, peace, and prosperity.


Opinion: Buhari Regime Responds to Twitter in less than 2hours but has not responded to Ibarapa Massacre #JusticeForIgangan,

Opinion: Buhari Regime Responds to Twitter in less than 2hours but has not responded to Ibarapa Massacre #JusticeForIgangan,


It took Buhari Regime less than 2hours to call a press conference in response to the deletion of Buhari’s Tweet by Twitter.



14 hours after the gruesome massacare​ of helpless and hapless Nigerian victims in IGANGAN, Oyo state, both Lai Mohammed and the FG are still SILENT up till this very moment!


#June12Protest #BuhariMustGo #RevolutionNow


It took Buhari Regime less than 2hours to call a press conference in response to the deletion of Buhari’s Tweet by Twitter.



14 hours after the gruesome massacare​ of helpless and hapless Nigerian victims in IGANGAN, Oyo state, both Lai Mohammed and the FG are still SILENT up till this very moment!


#June12Protest #BuhariMustGo #RevolutionNow

What is Twitter up to as Major General Muhammadu Buhari bars Nigerians from using the Social media

What is Twitter up to as Major General Muhammadu Buhari bars Nigerians from using the Social media


Is Twitter working to restore freedom to use it's platform to Nigerians who have been denied access by the draconian President of Nigeria Major General Muhammadu Buhari?


Already, Nigerian are still on Twitter using VPN. But with the twitter public policy, there seems to o be a help coming for many who are still interested from using the twitter space.


Is Twitter working to restore freedom to use it's platform to Nigerians who have been denied access by the draconian President of Nigeria Major General Muhammadu Buhari?


Already, Nigerian are still on Twitter using VPN. But with the twitter public policy, there seems to o be a help coming for many who are still interested from using the twitter space.

Ghana Is Eating Nigeria’s Lunch

Ghana Is Eating Nigeria’s Lunch

By Bámidélé Adémólá-Olátéjú  



“Twitter is now present on the continent. 


Thank you Ghana and Nana Akufo-Addo”. 


Those were the words of the co-founder and CEO of Twitter, Jack Dorsey, in a tweet yesterday. 


Within two minutes, yes two minutes, the President of Ghana, Nana Akufo-Addo tweeted: 


“The choice of Ghana as HQ for Twitter’s Africa operations is EXCELLENT news. Government and Ghanaians welcome very much this announcement and the confidence reposed in our country”.


Why Ghana? 


Jack Dorsey gave insightful reasons for their choice of Ghana. 


The statement reads: 


‘’As a champion for democracy, Ghana is a supporter of free speech, online freedom, and the Open Internet, of which Twitter is also an advocate. 


Furthermore, Ghana’s recent appointment to host The Secretariat of the African Continental Free Trade Area aligns with our overarching goal to establish a presence in the region that will support our efforts to improve and tailor our service across Africa.”


It important to note that Nana Akufo-Addo sealed the deal in a virtual meeting on April 7. 


It takes foresight, digital literacy and continuous interest in learning to engage in such deals. 


Can our president understand the nuances of cutting edge technology and its import for jobs and innovation? 


Can the stone age polymorph, Isa Pantami pull off a deal this juicy? 


Will Alhaji Lai Mohammed make any sense of the future without recourse to the consequences of free speech?


Nigerian Twitterattis were downcast on seeing Ghana trending, preening, and basking in the euphoria of their win. 


Their win is our loss. 


Nigeria is the market, Ghana is the hub. Nigeria has 25 million Twitter users, while Ghana’s combined social media presence is a measly eight million. 


How did that uppercut feel? 


Michelin left for Ghana, 

Dunlop left for Ghana, and many others. 


Soon Nigeria’s monied elite will start buying up Ghana the same way they financed Dubai, instead of fixing Nigeria. 


Twitter will, of course, hire many Nigerians and they will have Ghana as their base.


Twitter’s advertisement for several positions requiring deep knowledge of Nigeria’s major languages is already out there. 


The major benefits will go to Ghana. 


Businesses follow reason and facts, not emotions or wishful thinking. 



They exist to make money, not to feed fat cats or go to risky places. 


Why would smart money choose Nigeria when Ghana gives incentives such as 15-year tax holidays, free land and other policy initiatives, which would help drive their businesses? 


Why would Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) go to Nigeria with a rank of 131 in the ease of doing business, compared to Ghana’s rank of 118?


In Nigeria:

Insecurity ✔️

Religious strife ✔️

Unfavorable regulatory and legal environment ✔️

Unstable Macroeconomic policies ✔️


Why would any business choose Nigeria, the home of Boko Haram, the second deadliest terror group in the world to Ghana? 


When Fulani herdsmen wanted to start their murderous rampage in Ghana, it took a single policy directive for them to know Ghana is a no-go area. 


No good company whose best assets are its employees, would want to spend an unreasonable amount of money on life insurance and armed escorts to protect those in its employ for fear of kidnapping and outright slaughter.


How about the see-saw monetary policies, high inflation and unemployment? Only last week, Governor Godwin Obaseki lamented the printing of sixty billion naira (N60 bn) for sharing by the three tiers of government to finance the budget deficit. 


Are the consequences of unguarded quantitative easing lost on the government? 


Are they unconcerned with inflation depreciation and loss in bonds caused by their “ways and means” abracadabra?


Is a place notorious for religious hypocrisy, and ethnic strife the best place for a social media behemoth? 


How about our arbitrary, knee-jerk and counterproductive regulatory environment? 


The whole world paid attention to Nigeria’s treatment of Uber and Gokada. 


They could be business school case studies on how not to stifle innovation. 


If Twitter were to consider Nigeria, what our folks would have demanded in bribes would have killed any enthusiasm the company may have had. 


Nigeria’s reputation precedes it as a prodigious and prodigal consumer, instead of a shrewd and calculating producer. 


From a political and economic perspective, our commitment to the rule of law is a charade and the world knows it. 


Same for our understanding of property, intellectual and contractual rights.

Ghana is eating our lunch and we seem incapable of defending our portion. 


The crises facing Nigeria are extraordinary, requiring the smartest, and most patriotic minds to tackle. 


We missed the mark long ago and we don’t seem to realise how big a hole we have dug ourselves in. 


How we respond, going forward, will set the trajectory for coming decades. 


Nothing can save us except well meaning reforms and restructuring. 


No one will take a country enmeshed in selective policies like closing southern borders, while the northern ones are open seriously. 


Most of West African trade pass through the Seme/Odiroko border. 


Nigeria should reopen all its land borders.


Playing favourites with the foreign exchange rate is not only wicked, it kills competition. 


Let the naira have a market-driven exchange rate and ease forex restrictions on business. 


Subsidies for the rich and the middle class must end, to curb luxurious consumption. 


This can be done by the complete floating of petroleum product prices. 


Efforts to fix the power sector is commendable but a lot still needs to be done.


Finally, the rent mentality has to be erased from our memory by reforming the tax system. 


If we pay reasonable taxes, chances are, we will demand accountability and responsibility. 


We will be able to reject a system of collecting taxes in Lagos to fund projects in Yobe State. 


Let each State eat, what it kills. 


It will be painful at the first but the pain can be assuaged by direct cash transfers to the vulnerable and poor. 


By all indicators, Ghana is leading. 


Will Nigeria fold its arms?



Bámidélé Adémólá-Olátéjú a farmer, youth advocate and political analyst writes this weekly column, “Bamidele Upfront” for PREMIUM TIMES.

By Bámidélé Adémólá-Olátéjú  



“Twitter is now present on the continent. 


Thank you Ghana and Nana Akufo-Addo”. 


Those were the words of the co-founder and CEO of Twitter, Jack Dorsey, in a tweet yesterday. 


Within two minutes, yes two minutes, the President of Ghana, Nana Akufo-Addo tweeted: 


“The choice of Ghana as HQ for Twitter’s Africa operations is EXCELLENT news. Government and Ghanaians welcome very much this announcement and the confidence reposed in our country”.


Why Ghana? 


Jack Dorsey gave insightful reasons for their choice of Ghana. 


The statement reads: 


‘’As a champion for democracy, Ghana is a supporter of free speech, online freedom, and the Open Internet, of which Twitter is also an advocate. 


Furthermore, Ghana’s recent appointment to host The Secretariat of the African Continental Free Trade Area aligns with our overarching goal to establish a presence in the region that will support our efforts to improve and tailor our service across Africa.”


It important to note that Nana Akufo-Addo sealed the deal in a virtual meeting on April 7. 


It takes foresight, digital literacy and continuous interest in learning to engage in such deals. 


Can our president understand the nuances of cutting edge technology and its import for jobs and innovation? 


Can the stone age polymorph, Isa Pantami pull off a deal this juicy? 


Will Alhaji Lai Mohammed make any sense of the future without recourse to the consequences of free speech?


Nigerian Twitterattis were downcast on seeing Ghana trending, preening, and basking in the euphoria of their win. 


Their win is our loss. 


Nigeria is the market, Ghana is the hub. Nigeria has 25 million Twitter users, while Ghana’s combined social media presence is a measly eight million. 


How did that uppercut feel? 


Michelin left for Ghana, 

Dunlop left for Ghana, and many others. 


Soon Nigeria’s monied elite will start buying up Ghana the same way they financed Dubai, instead of fixing Nigeria. 


Twitter will, of course, hire many Nigerians and they will have Ghana as their base.


Twitter’s advertisement for several positions requiring deep knowledge of Nigeria’s major languages is already out there. 


The major benefits will go to Ghana. 


Businesses follow reason and facts, not emotions or wishful thinking. 



They exist to make money, not to feed fat cats or go to risky places. 


Why would smart money choose Nigeria when Ghana gives incentives such as 15-year tax holidays, free land and other policy initiatives, which would help drive their businesses? 


Why would Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) go to Nigeria with a rank of 131 in the ease of doing business, compared to Ghana’s rank of 118?


In Nigeria:

Insecurity ✔️

Religious strife ✔️

Unfavorable regulatory and legal environment ✔️

Unstable Macroeconomic policies ✔️


Why would any business choose Nigeria, the home of Boko Haram, the second deadliest terror group in the world to Ghana? 


When Fulani herdsmen wanted to start their murderous rampage in Ghana, it took a single policy directive for them to know Ghana is a no-go area. 


No good company whose best assets are its employees, would want to spend an unreasonable amount of money on life insurance and armed escorts to protect those in its employ for fear of kidnapping and outright slaughter.


How about the see-saw monetary policies, high inflation and unemployment? Only last week, Governor Godwin Obaseki lamented the printing of sixty billion naira (N60 bn) for sharing by the three tiers of government to finance the budget deficit. 


Are the consequences of unguarded quantitative easing lost on the government? 


Are they unconcerned with inflation depreciation and loss in bonds caused by their “ways and means” abracadabra?


Is a place notorious for religious hypocrisy, and ethnic strife the best place for a social media behemoth? 


How about our arbitrary, knee-jerk and counterproductive regulatory environment? 


The whole world paid attention to Nigeria’s treatment of Uber and Gokada. 


They could be business school case studies on how not to stifle innovation. 


If Twitter were to consider Nigeria, what our folks would have demanded in bribes would have killed any enthusiasm the company may have had. 


Nigeria’s reputation precedes it as a prodigious and prodigal consumer, instead of a shrewd and calculating producer. 


From a political and economic perspective, our commitment to the rule of law is a charade and the world knows it. 


Same for our understanding of property, intellectual and contractual rights.

Ghana is eating our lunch and we seem incapable of defending our portion. 


The crises facing Nigeria are extraordinary, requiring the smartest, and most patriotic minds to tackle. 


We missed the mark long ago and we don’t seem to realise how big a hole we have dug ourselves in. 


How we respond, going forward, will set the trajectory for coming decades. 


Nothing can save us except well meaning reforms and restructuring. 


No one will take a country enmeshed in selective policies like closing southern borders, while the northern ones are open seriously. 


Most of West African trade pass through the Seme/Odiroko border. 


Nigeria should reopen all its land borders.


Playing favourites with the foreign exchange rate is not only wicked, it kills competition. 


Let the naira have a market-driven exchange rate and ease forex restrictions on business. 


Subsidies for the rich and the middle class must end, to curb luxurious consumption. 


This can be done by the complete floating of petroleum product prices. 


Efforts to fix the power sector is commendable but a lot still needs to be done.


Finally, the rent mentality has to be erased from our memory by reforming the tax system. 


If we pay reasonable taxes, chances are, we will demand accountability and responsibility. 


We will be able to reject a system of collecting taxes in Lagos to fund projects in Yobe State. 


Let each State eat, what it kills. 


It will be painful at the first but the pain can be assuaged by direct cash transfers to the vulnerable and poor. 


By all indicators, Ghana is leading. 


Will Nigeria fold its arms?



Bámidélé Adémólá-Olátéjú a farmer, youth advocate and political analyst writes this weekly column, “Bamidele Upfront” for PREMIUM TIMES.

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