news

China

Followers

Showing posts with label China. Show all posts
Showing posts with label China. Show all posts

Fear of China's Domination: Joe Biden Imposes a series of tariffs on goods made in China

Fear of China's Domination: Joe Biden Imposes a series of tariffs on goods made in China

Biden &XI
Photo credit: BBC

The President of United States Joe Biden has imposed a series of tariffs on goods made in China following a revelationd that the Chinese are more than determined to dominate the world in such aspects.


According to President Biden, China is determined to dominate industries which includes : Steel and aluminum, Semiconductors, EVs and solar panels.


Consequently Biden has imposed heavy tariffs on them: 

25% on steel and aluminum,
50% on semiconductors,
100% on EVs,
And 50% on solar panels.




Biden criticized Donald Trump's measure against China but obviously taken Trump's options . 

Biden &XI
Photo credit: BBC

The President of United States Joe Biden has imposed a series of tariffs on goods made in China following a revelationd that the Chinese are more than determined to dominate the world in such aspects.


According to President Biden, China is determined to dominate industries which includes : Steel and aluminum, Semiconductors, EVs and solar panels.


Consequently Biden has imposed heavy tariffs on them: 

25% on steel and aluminum,
50% on semiconductors,
100% on EVs,
And 50% on solar panels.




Biden criticized Donald Trump's measure against China but obviously taken Trump's options . 

FCCPC summons Chinese supermarket over discrimination against Nigerians

FCCPC summons Chinese supermarket over discrimination against Nigerians


The Federal Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (FCCPC) has summoned the owner of a Chinese supermarket for allegedly discriminating against Nigerians by restricting their entry.

The supermarket, located at the China General Chamber of Commerce along Umaru Musa Yar’Adua Road in the Federal Capital Territory, exclusively permits individuals of Chinese descent to enter. A video posted by X Daily showed an unidentified FCT resident expressing discontent about the discriminatory policy.

Reacting to the development, Mrs. Boladale Adeyinka, the Director of Surveillance and Investigation at the commission, who led the enforcement ,stated that they are responding to a viral video allegedly showing Nigerian consumers being denied access to the supermarket. She explained that the purpose of their surveillance and investigation is to verify the allegations and the contents of the viral video. “On arrival, we noticed that the supermarket, located right behind me, was sealed and padlocked externally. Inquiries have revealed that as of this morning, this supermarket was open and operational,” she said. “CCTV footage also indicates that at around 8:29 am on Monday, two vehicles departed from these premises allegedly containing the owner of the supermarket, whom we have identified as Cindy Liun Bien, and we have her contact details. “Now, the summons, of course, since she’s not around and the place is locked, is to serve notice on her to appear before the Federal Competition and Consumer Protection Commission by Wednesday, April 24, 2024, at 11 am. “There are other regulatory tools that can be deployed if she fails to attend to this summons,” she added. She further explained that the summons means that entry into the premises would require approval, and anyone wishing to access it must first notify the commission. When asked about the consequences if the owner fails to attend the summons, she stated that under the commission’s investigative powers, they have the authority to seal the premises until she complies. Sanusi Shuabiu, the estate assistant Facilities Manager, clarified that the supermarket is not open to the public like a typical store; rather, it primarily serves Chinese groceries and was initially established to cater to the needs of co-tenants in the area. He confirmed that there is no agreement restricting the supermarket to Chinese residents only; it is meant to serve everyone, including those from outside the community.


The Federal Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (FCCPC) has summoned the owner of a Chinese supermarket for allegedly discriminating against Nigerians by restricting their entry.

The supermarket, located at the China General Chamber of Commerce along Umaru Musa Yar’Adua Road in the Federal Capital Territory, exclusively permits individuals of Chinese descent to enter. A video posted by X Daily showed an unidentified FCT resident expressing discontent about the discriminatory policy.

Reacting to the development, Mrs. Boladale Adeyinka, the Director of Surveillance and Investigation at the commission, who led the enforcement ,stated that they are responding to a viral video allegedly showing Nigerian consumers being denied access to the supermarket. She explained that the purpose of their surveillance and investigation is to verify the allegations and the contents of the viral video. “On arrival, we noticed that the supermarket, located right behind me, was sealed and padlocked externally. Inquiries have revealed that as of this morning, this supermarket was open and operational,” she said. “CCTV footage also indicates that at around 8:29 am on Monday, two vehicles departed from these premises allegedly containing the owner of the supermarket, whom we have identified as Cindy Liun Bien, and we have her contact details. “Now, the summons, of course, since she’s not around and the place is locked, is to serve notice on her to appear before the Federal Competition and Consumer Protection Commission by Wednesday, April 24, 2024, at 11 am. “There are other regulatory tools that can be deployed if she fails to attend to this summons,” she added. She further explained that the summons means that entry into the premises would require approval, and anyone wishing to access it must first notify the commission. When asked about the consequences if the owner fails to attend the summons, she stated that under the commission’s investigative powers, they have the authority to seal the premises until she complies. Sanusi Shuabiu, the estate assistant Facilities Manager, clarified that the supermarket is not open to the public like a typical store; rather, it primarily serves Chinese groceries and was initially established to cater to the needs of co-tenants in the area. He confirmed that there is no agreement restricting the supermarket to Chinese residents only; it is meant to serve everyone, including those from outside the community.

China says US ‘fanning threat of war’, Ukraine social and economy dealt a serious blow

China says US ‘fanning threat of war’, Ukraine social and economy dealt a serious blow

Intelligence reports claiming a Russian invasion could be imminent have hit the Ukrainian economy hard



Claims from Western politicians and spy agencies that Russian bombs could start falling on Ukraine at any moment as part of an all-out invasion have dealt a heavy social and economic blow to Kiev, Beijing has claimed.

Speaking at a press conference on Wednesday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin weighed in on the standoff on the border between the two Eastern European nations, arguing that Washington has contributed to rapidly rising tensions.

“Over the last few days, the US has been fanning the threat of war, artificially creating a tense atmosphere, which has dealt a serious blow to the economy, social stability and living conditions of the people of Ukraine,” he said.

According to the diplomat, Washington has also increased “the resistance to advancing negotiations and dialogue among the parties concerned.”

Wang’s remarks come amid an impasse between East and West in recent months, with a number of leaders repeatedly warning that Russia could soon order an invasion of Ukraine. Officials in Washington have even gone so far as to claim that Moscow could launch the attack during the Beijing Winter Olympics.

Earlier this week, Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby announced that the US is becoming increasingly concerned about the “burgeoning relationship between Russia and China” and Beijing’s “tacit support” for Moscow on issues of European security.

The Kremlin has repeatedly insisted that it has no aggressive intentions against Ukraine. On Tuesday, Moscow’s Ministry of Defense announced that its troops had wrapped up their training drills in Belarus near the Ukrainian border, and would begin the process of returning to their permanent bases.

Amid rumors that an incursion into Ukraine is imminent, Moscow has sought to obtain security guarantees that would limit both NATO’s expansion closer to its borders and its presence in Eastern Europe.

Following a meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping in Beijing ahead of the opening of the Winter Olympic Games earlier this month, the Kremlin published a joint declaration in which both sides called for an end to the US-led military bloc’s expansion. “The parties oppose the further expansion of NATO and call for the North Atlantic Alliance to refrain from ideological approaches from the time of the Cold War,” the statement read.

The two nations have emphasized the importance of their partnership in an array of spheres, such as their booming trade, energy, economics, and defense. According to Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov, Xi is fully on board with Moscow’s pursuit of attaining security assurances from the West, noting in December that the Chinese leader is “naturally well aware of and understands the main issue: the concerns Russia has on its western borders.”

However, several analysts have speculated that this seemingly budding collaboration between Moscow and Beijing may not be as developed when compared to blocs such as NATO.



Intelligence reports claiming a Russian invasion could be imminent have hit the Ukrainian economy hard



Claims from Western politicians and spy agencies that Russian bombs could start falling on Ukraine at any moment as part of an all-out invasion have dealt a heavy social and economic blow to Kiev, Beijing has claimed.

Speaking at a press conference on Wednesday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin weighed in on the standoff on the border between the two Eastern European nations, arguing that Washington has contributed to rapidly rising tensions.

“Over the last few days, the US has been fanning the threat of war, artificially creating a tense atmosphere, which has dealt a serious blow to the economy, social stability and living conditions of the people of Ukraine,” he said.

According to the diplomat, Washington has also increased “the resistance to advancing negotiations and dialogue among the parties concerned.”

Wang’s remarks come amid an impasse between East and West in recent months, with a number of leaders repeatedly warning that Russia could soon order an invasion of Ukraine. Officials in Washington have even gone so far as to claim that Moscow could launch the attack during the Beijing Winter Olympics.

Earlier this week, Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby announced that the US is becoming increasingly concerned about the “burgeoning relationship between Russia and China” and Beijing’s “tacit support” for Moscow on issues of European security.

The Kremlin has repeatedly insisted that it has no aggressive intentions against Ukraine. On Tuesday, Moscow’s Ministry of Defense announced that its troops had wrapped up their training drills in Belarus near the Ukrainian border, and would begin the process of returning to their permanent bases.

Amid rumors that an incursion into Ukraine is imminent, Moscow has sought to obtain security guarantees that would limit both NATO’s expansion closer to its borders and its presence in Eastern Europe.

Following a meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping in Beijing ahead of the opening of the Winter Olympic Games earlier this month, the Kremlin published a joint declaration in which both sides called for an end to the US-led military bloc’s expansion. “The parties oppose the further expansion of NATO and call for the North Atlantic Alliance to refrain from ideological approaches from the time of the Cold War,” the statement read.

The two nations have emphasized the importance of their partnership in an array of spheres, such as their booming trade, energy, economics, and defense. According to Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov, Xi is fully on board with Moscow’s pursuit of attaining security assurances from the West, noting in December that the Chinese leader is “naturally well aware of and understands the main issue: the concerns Russia has on its western borders.”

However, several analysts have speculated that this seemingly budding collaboration between Moscow and Beijing may not be as developed when compared to blocs such as NATO.



White House defends Fauci from new attacks over China grants

White House defends Fauci from new attacks over China grants







Dr. Anthony Fauci


WASHINGTON — The White House said Thursday that it stood by Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top medical adviser to President Biden, who has faced renewed attacks this week from conservatives over the extent to which the U.S. biomedical establishment funded potentially dangerous research into bat coronaviruses in Chinese laboratories.

Asked on Thursday by a Fox News reporter whether Fauci’s job was safe, despite new revelations, White House press secretary Jen Psaki responded curtly, with a single word: “Correct.”

Fauci has previously said that the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, of which he is the longtime head, did not allow Chinese laboratories to conduct gain-of-function research through American grants. Some people believe that such research, which boosts viruses in order to study their behavior, led to the creation of the pathogen known as SARS-CoV-2 at the Wuhan Institute of Virology or another laboratory sometime in late 2019.

The focus on Fauci this week is related to documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request and published by the investigative news site the Intercept. The documents included details of a $3.1 million 2014 grant to EcoHealth Alliance, a New York-based organization that has been the focus of intense scrutiny over its close partnership with China and because of the ardent rejections by its chief executive, Peter Daszak, of any suggestion that a scientific accident there may have caused the pandemic.

EcoHealth Alliance used $599,000 of the $3.1 million grant to fund a study into bat coronaviruses at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, which has itself been the focus of both conspiratorial and legitimate questions. Researchers there worked on a strain of coronavirus called WIV1, according to the Intercept.

Federal officials denied that the research conducted with U.S. funds in Wuhan met gain-of-function criteria. “NIH has never approved any research that would make a coronavirus more dangerous to humans,” an agency spokesperson told Yahoo News. “The research we supported in China, where coronaviruses are prevalent, sought to understand the behavior of coronaviruses circulating in bats that have the potential to cause widespread disease.”

The existence of WIV1 is hardly a secret, but the revelations in the Intercept’s reporting seem to challenge Fauci’s earlier statements that the U.S. biomedical establishment has never funded gain-of-function research in China. “This is a road map to the high-risk research that could have led to the current pandemic,” one researcher told the Intercept.

Still, there is no evidence that research into WIV1 led to the creation of SARS-CoV-2. Nor is there evidence that Fauci, who first gained renown in the 1980s during the HIV/AIDS epidemic, acted improperly or intentionally misrepresented U.S. partnerships.

Nevertheless, the Intercept revelations are sure to raise new questions, especially given signs that the pandemic may persist even into 2022. Peter Navarro, who served as a top aide of former President Donald Trump, often clashed with Fauci and, on Thursday, called the widely respected immunologist a “stone cold liar” on Twitter. “He belongs in an orange jumpsuit, not a lab coat,” Navarro opined.

Members of Congress, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., have lambasted Fauci and other scientists for misleading the public about the origins of the pandemic.

“These documents are a smoking gun that indicate he not only failed to be forthcoming, but that he also lied to the American people about his organization’s support for this risky research,” said Rep. Mike Gallagher, R-Wisc., who also called on Fauci to resign.

So did Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., a potential presidential candidate in 2024, who, like McCarthy, said that Fauci should “face a congressional inquiry.”

Should Republicans retake either chamber of Congress in next year’s elections, they are all but certain to launch such inquiries, given how much animosity Fauci has inspired among conservatives.

Read more from the source






Dr. Anthony Fauci


WASHINGTON — The White House said Thursday that it stood by Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top medical adviser to President Biden, who has faced renewed attacks this week from conservatives over the extent to which the U.S. biomedical establishment funded potentially dangerous research into bat coronaviruses in Chinese laboratories.

Asked on Thursday by a Fox News reporter whether Fauci’s job was safe, despite new revelations, White House press secretary Jen Psaki responded curtly, with a single word: “Correct.”

Fauci has previously said that the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, of which he is the longtime head, did not allow Chinese laboratories to conduct gain-of-function research through American grants. Some people believe that such research, which boosts viruses in order to study their behavior, led to the creation of the pathogen known as SARS-CoV-2 at the Wuhan Institute of Virology or another laboratory sometime in late 2019.

The focus on Fauci this week is related to documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request and published by the investigative news site the Intercept. The documents included details of a $3.1 million 2014 grant to EcoHealth Alliance, a New York-based organization that has been the focus of intense scrutiny over its close partnership with China and because of the ardent rejections by its chief executive, Peter Daszak, of any suggestion that a scientific accident there may have caused the pandemic.

EcoHealth Alliance used $599,000 of the $3.1 million grant to fund a study into bat coronaviruses at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, which has itself been the focus of both conspiratorial and legitimate questions. Researchers there worked on a strain of coronavirus called WIV1, according to the Intercept.

Federal officials denied that the research conducted with U.S. funds in Wuhan met gain-of-function criteria. “NIH has never approved any research that would make a coronavirus more dangerous to humans,” an agency spokesperson told Yahoo News. “The research we supported in China, where coronaviruses are prevalent, sought to understand the behavior of coronaviruses circulating in bats that have the potential to cause widespread disease.”

The existence of WIV1 is hardly a secret, but the revelations in the Intercept’s reporting seem to challenge Fauci’s earlier statements that the U.S. biomedical establishment has never funded gain-of-function research in China. “This is a road map to the high-risk research that could have led to the current pandemic,” one researcher told the Intercept.

Still, there is no evidence that research into WIV1 led to the creation of SARS-CoV-2. Nor is there evidence that Fauci, who first gained renown in the 1980s during the HIV/AIDS epidemic, acted improperly or intentionally misrepresented U.S. partnerships.

Nevertheless, the Intercept revelations are sure to raise new questions, especially given signs that the pandemic may persist even into 2022. Peter Navarro, who served as a top aide of former President Donald Trump, often clashed with Fauci and, on Thursday, called the widely respected immunologist a “stone cold liar” on Twitter. “He belongs in an orange jumpsuit, not a lab coat,” Navarro opined.

Members of Congress, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., have lambasted Fauci and other scientists for misleading the public about the origins of the pandemic.

“These documents are a smoking gun that indicate he not only failed to be forthcoming, but that he also lied to the American people about his organization’s support for this risky research,” said Rep. Mike Gallagher, R-Wisc., who also called on Fauci to resign.

So did Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., a potential presidential candidate in 2024, who, like McCarthy, said that Fauci should “face a congressional inquiry.”

Should Republicans retake either chamber of Congress in next year’s elections, they are all but certain to launch such inquiries, given how much animosity Fauci has inspired among conservatives.

Read more from the source

#Mideast: United States Warns China Against Buying Iranian Crude Oil

#Mideast: United States Warns China Against Buying Iranian Crude Oil


The United States of America has again warned China that it will not turn a blind eye to rising Iranian oil exports to Chinese ports, the Financial Times reported

The report, citing a senior Biden administration official says Washington has not missed the substantial increase in Iranian crude shipments to China. 

U.S reminded Beijing that there are still sanctions in place against the Islamic republic of Iran. “We’ve told the Chinese that we will continue to enforce our sanctions,” the unnamed official told the FT. “There will be no tacit green light.”

Yet the Trump-era sanctions may be waived if Iran and the U.S. make it to the negotiation table. “Ultimately, our goal is not to enforce the sanctions; it is to get to the point where we lift sanctions and Iran reverses its nuclear steps,” the official told the FT.

The Asia leader and the second largest economy has been ramping up shipments of crude from Iran  from an average of 306,000 bpd last year. 

This month, China has been taking in some 856,000 bpd of Iranian crude—a 129-percent rise over February. The China’s interest in Iranian oil has been based on a comprehensive strategic partnership between the two countries. The initiative expects trade between the two countries to reach $600 billion over the next decade

In addition, China’s Belt and Road initiative (BRI) attempts to strengthen regional political, economic, and strategic ties, with a focus on the energy industry. But Iranian oil is also attractive for a very simple reason: Iran is selling it at a deep discount because of the sanctions. 

According to oilprice.com The low price makes Iranian crude attractive for other Asian buyers too, such as India, which has been on the hunt for alternatives to Middle Eastern OPEC oil because of its high price.

As regarding the President Donald Trump Era sanctions that are still in effective which Iran tagged economic terrorism against the Islamic Republic, Tehran has insisted that the Wasington first lift sanctions before negotiations on the nuclear deal start while the U.S. wants negotiations first, sanction-lifting later.


Economic Terrorism, Genocidal Taunts Won't 'End Iran' - FM Zarif Reply Trump

The United States of America has again warned China that it will not turn a blind eye to rising Iranian oil exports to Chinese ports, the Financial Times reported

The report, citing a senior Biden administration official says Washington has not missed the substantial increase in Iranian crude shipments to China. 

U.S reminded Beijing that there are still sanctions in place against the Islamic republic of Iran. “We’ve told the Chinese that we will continue to enforce our sanctions,” the unnamed official told the FT. “There will be no tacit green light.”

Yet the Trump-era sanctions may be waived if Iran and the U.S. make it to the negotiation table. “Ultimately, our goal is not to enforce the sanctions; it is to get to the point where we lift sanctions and Iran reverses its nuclear steps,” the official told the FT.

The Asia leader and the second largest economy has been ramping up shipments of crude from Iran  from an average of 306,000 bpd last year. 

This month, China has been taking in some 856,000 bpd of Iranian crude—a 129-percent rise over February. The China’s interest in Iranian oil has been based on a comprehensive strategic partnership between the two countries. The initiative expects trade between the two countries to reach $600 billion over the next decade

In addition, China’s Belt and Road initiative (BRI) attempts to strengthen regional political, economic, and strategic ties, with a focus on the energy industry. But Iranian oil is also attractive for a very simple reason: Iran is selling it at a deep discount because of the sanctions. 

According to oilprice.com The low price makes Iranian crude attractive for other Asian buyers too, such as India, which has been on the hunt for alternatives to Middle Eastern OPEC oil because of its high price.

As regarding the President Donald Trump Era sanctions that are still in effective which Iran tagged economic terrorism against the Islamic Republic, Tehran has insisted that the Wasington first lift sanctions before negotiations on the nuclear deal start while the U.S. wants negotiations first, sanction-lifting later.


Economic Terrorism, Genocidal Taunts Won't 'End Iran' - FM Zarif Reply Trump

Cold War Continues as Washington declares China's Huawei threat to national security

Cold War Continues as Washington declares China's Huawei threat to national security


The United States' Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has deemed Chinese telecom giant Huawei a threat to American national security, maintaining pressure on Beijing that some believed could ease under the new Biden administration.

According to the announcement made Friday by the FCC, the Huawei as well as four other Chinese companies, pose “an unacceptable risk to US national security or the security and safety of US persons.”

Jessica Rosenworcel who is the incumbent FCC’s acting chief said that the move would help “restore trust” in US communications networks. 

Rosenworcel did not explain what specific actions would be taken against the Chinese companies while Huawei has not yet responded to the designation.

The decision comes just a day after Bloomberg reported that the Biden administration issued new restrictions on Huawei, preventing US firms from supplying the Chinese telecom with products that can be used in 5G devices. 

American businesses had previously been allowed to supply Huawei with components, provided that they sought permission from the US government. 

Beijing slammed the new rule as “unreasonable suppression” aimed at Chinese companies, and accused Washington of “violating the principles of market economy and fair competition.”

Huawei’s designation as a national security threat matches the hardline policy implemented by the preceding administration under Donald Trump. 

In June, the FCC blacklisted the firm as a danger to US interests, blocking American firms from using an $8.3 billion government fund to purchase equipment from companies. Huawei filed a legal challenge against the designation last month.

The Chinese tech giant had expressed hope that the new administration would take a different approach to trade issues. 

Victor Zhang, the company’s vice president, said in an interview in November that the attacks on Huawei were politically motivated and part of a “trade war” between the US and China, adding that Washington’s tune might change once Biden takes office.

As it launched a tariff war against Beijing, the Trump administration pressured Washington’s allies to reject business with Huawei and avoid using Chinese technology as they develop their 5G networks.

 Both the Chinese government and Huawei have repeatedly denied that the firm poses a threat to the US or any other nation. 

The economic war and confrontations between the two most developed economies has been the major  indices before the emergency of COVID-19 Pandemic in 2019.



The United States' Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has deemed Chinese telecom giant Huawei a threat to American national security, maintaining pressure on Beijing that some believed could ease under the new Biden administration.

According to the announcement made Friday by the FCC, the Huawei as well as four other Chinese companies, pose “an unacceptable risk to US national security or the security and safety of US persons.”

Jessica Rosenworcel who is the incumbent FCC’s acting chief said that the move would help “restore trust” in US communications networks. 

Rosenworcel did not explain what specific actions would be taken against the Chinese companies while Huawei has not yet responded to the designation.

The decision comes just a day after Bloomberg reported that the Biden administration issued new restrictions on Huawei, preventing US firms from supplying the Chinese telecom with products that can be used in 5G devices. 

American businesses had previously been allowed to supply Huawei with components, provided that they sought permission from the US government. 

Beijing slammed the new rule as “unreasonable suppression” aimed at Chinese companies, and accused Washington of “violating the principles of market economy and fair competition.”

Huawei’s designation as a national security threat matches the hardline policy implemented by the preceding administration under Donald Trump. 

In June, the FCC blacklisted the firm as a danger to US interests, blocking American firms from using an $8.3 billion government fund to purchase equipment from companies. Huawei filed a legal challenge against the designation last month.

The Chinese tech giant had expressed hope that the new administration would take a different approach to trade issues. 

Victor Zhang, the company’s vice president, said in an interview in November that the attacks on Huawei were politically motivated and part of a “trade war” between the US and China, adding that Washington’s tune might change once Biden takes office.

As it launched a tariff war against Beijing, the Trump administration pressured Washington’s allies to reject business with Huawei and avoid using Chinese technology as they develop their 5G networks.

 Both the Chinese government and Huawei have repeatedly denied that the firm poses a threat to the US or any other nation. 

The economic war and confrontations between the two most developed economies has been the major  indices before the emergency of COVID-19 Pandemic in 2019.


Russian agricultural exports soar by 30% as China and Turkey ramp up purchases

Russian agricultural exports soar by 30% as China and Turkey ramp up purchases


RT: Exports of Russian agricultural products have increased by 28.1 percent in the first two months of 2021 against the same period a year ago, amounting to $4.51 billion, the Russian Agricultural Ministry reports.


Foreign sales of grains rose 86.4 percent to $1.916 billion, while exports of fat-and-oil products saw a modest growth of 9.2 percent to $787 million, according to the ministry. Exports of meat and dairy products grew by 32.8 percent to $154 million.

Meanwhile, sales of fish and seafood dropped 27.2 percent to $521 million. Exports of the food and processing industry also saw a decrease of 5.1 percent to $394 million.

The list of top consumers of Russia’s agricultural products is still topped by China, which has raised its imports of Russian food supplies to $822 million since the beginning of the year. That’s 24.4 percent more than the nation purchased within the same period in 2020.

China’s share in the total volume of shipments of agricultural products from Russia is currently at 18.2 percent.

Turkey, the second biggest importer of Russian agricultural goods, increased its purchases by 35.5 percent to $687 million. The nation accounts for 15.2 percent of Russia’s overall agricultural sales.

The European Union ranks third, accounting for 10.4 percent of Russian food imports. The bloc purchased $470 million worth of agricultural produce from Russia, marking a year-on-year drop of 3.5 percent.

Egypt, South Korea, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, and Mongolia remain the other major buyers of food products from Russia.


RT Source

RT: Exports of Russian agricultural products have increased by 28.1 percent in the first two months of 2021 against the same period a year ago, amounting to $4.51 billion, the Russian Agricultural Ministry reports.


Foreign sales of grains rose 86.4 percent to $1.916 billion, while exports of fat-and-oil products saw a modest growth of 9.2 percent to $787 million, according to the ministry. Exports of meat and dairy products grew by 32.8 percent to $154 million.

Meanwhile, sales of fish and seafood dropped 27.2 percent to $521 million. Exports of the food and processing industry also saw a decrease of 5.1 percent to $394 million.

The list of top consumers of Russia’s agricultural products is still topped by China, which has raised its imports of Russian food supplies to $822 million since the beginning of the year. That’s 24.4 percent more than the nation purchased within the same period in 2020.

China’s share in the total volume of shipments of agricultural products from Russia is currently at 18.2 percent.

Turkey, the second biggest importer of Russian agricultural goods, increased its purchases by 35.5 percent to $687 million. The nation accounts for 15.2 percent of Russia’s overall agricultural sales.

The European Union ranks third, accounting for 10.4 percent of Russian food imports. The bloc purchased $470 million worth of agricultural produce from Russia, marking a year-on-year drop of 3.5 percent.

Egypt, South Korea, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, and Mongolia remain the other major buyers of food products from Russia.


RT Source

WHO Teams probing COVID-19 origins in Wuhan set to brief media

WHO Teams probing COVID-19 origins in Wuhan set to brief media


An expert team from the World Health Organisation (WHO) that has spent the last four weeks in the Chinese city of Wuhan, investigating the origins of the coronavirus disease, is expected to brief the media on Tuesday.

The WHO team is set to present its findings at a news conference that begins at 08.00 GMT at the Hilton Optics Valley Hotel in Wuhan.

During their visit to Wuhan, which was the world’s first COVID-19 hotspot, WHO experts toured the Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Huanan market where the first known cases were identified.

The team also visited a hospital where the first COVID-19 patients were treated.

Participants in the WHO visit spent 14 days in quarantine upon their arrival in the Chinese city one month ago.

Vladimir Dedkov, a Russian expert participating in the WHO mission, said this past week that it was unlikely the disease could have spread from Wuhan’s virology institute.

(NAN)

An expert team from the World Health Organisation (WHO) that has spent the last four weeks in the Chinese city of Wuhan, investigating the origins of the coronavirus disease, is expected to brief the media on Tuesday.

The WHO team is set to present its findings at a news conference that begins at 08.00 GMT at the Hilton Optics Valley Hotel in Wuhan.

During their visit to Wuhan, which was the world’s first COVID-19 hotspot, WHO experts toured the Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Huanan market where the first known cases were identified.

The team also visited a hospital where the first COVID-19 patients were treated.

Participants in the WHO visit spent 14 days in quarantine upon their arrival in the Chinese city one month ago.

Vladimir Dedkov, a Russian expert participating in the WHO mission, said this past week that it was unlikely the disease could have spread from Wuhan’s virology institute.

(NAN)

Trump administration declassifies unconfirmed intelligence on China bounties on US forces in Afghanistan: report

Trump administration declassifies unconfirmed intelligence on China bounties on US forces in Afghanistan: report


The Trump administration is declassifying unconfirmed intelligence that indicates China paid nonstate actors in Afghanistan to attack U.S. soldiers, Axios reported Wednesday.

Two senior administration officials told Axios that the intelligence was included with President Trump’s briefing on Dec. 17. Administration officials from multiple agencies are attempting to corroborate the information. If the information is indeed true, it could drastically change China’s relationship with the U.S. and heighten tensions between the two superpowers.

The officials who spoke to Axios did not say where the information came from or what period of time it covered.

Axios noted that China has mostly remained out of Afghanistan while speaking to Taliban officials about peace deals. However, Chinese-made weapons and funding have intermittently made their way to Afghanistan, the news outlet reported.

Andrew Small, an expert on China-Afghanistan affairs, told Axios that such actions were not in line with China’s typical policies, noting that peace in Afghanistan is one area where the U.S. and China typically agree.

"They know the drawdown is taking place. We’re not in the context where anything else needs to happen to US troops in Afghanistan. There is no reason to create additional pressure on US forces,” said Small.

This report comes months after uncorroborated intelligence came out that Russia had offered bounties on U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Trump was condemned by lawmakers for his apparent reluctance to acknowledge or confront Russia on the reports.

According to Axios, it is unclear whether President-elect Joe Biden or any members of Congress have similarly been briefed on this information, though Biden has access to the President's Daily Brief.

If the intelligence ultimately cannot be corroborated, the decision to declassify it would fall into question, Axios noted.


The Hill


The Trump administration is declassifying unconfirmed intelligence that indicates China paid nonstate actors in Afghanistan to attack U.S. soldiers, Axios reported Wednesday.

Two senior administration officials told Axios that the intelligence was included with President Trump’s briefing on Dec. 17. Administration officials from multiple agencies are attempting to corroborate the information. If the information is indeed true, it could drastically change China’s relationship with the U.S. and heighten tensions between the two superpowers.

The officials who spoke to Axios did not say where the information came from or what period of time it covered.

Axios noted that China has mostly remained out of Afghanistan while speaking to Taliban officials about peace deals. However, Chinese-made weapons and funding have intermittently made their way to Afghanistan, the news outlet reported.

Andrew Small, an expert on China-Afghanistan affairs, told Axios that such actions were not in line with China’s typical policies, noting that peace in Afghanistan is one area where the U.S. and China typically agree.

"They know the drawdown is taking place. We’re not in the context where anything else needs to happen to US troops in Afghanistan. There is no reason to create additional pressure on US forces,” said Small.

This report comes months after uncorroborated intelligence came out that Russia had offered bounties on U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Trump was condemned by lawmakers for his apparent reluctance to acknowledge or confront Russia on the reports.

According to Axios, it is unclear whether President-elect Joe Biden or any members of Congress have similarly been briefed on this information, though Biden has access to the President's Daily Brief.

If the intelligence ultimately cannot be corroborated, the decision to declassify it would fall into question, Axios noted.


The Hill

A US-based Advocacy group says China strategically captured entire supply chain of America

A US-based Advocacy group says China strategically captured entire supply chain of America

 

Washington: China, over the past year, has strategically captured the entire supply chain of United States, making it vulnerable and dependent on Beijing, said Lucas Kunce, the national security director at the American Economic Liberties Project.

Kunce told The Hill that the business people who testified during recent congressional hearings on tariffs revealed that the US cannot produce essential products including certain weapons systems and US dollars "without some components or resources coming from China."

"So China has strategically captured our entire supply chain," he told The Hill. "And it makes us vulnerable, and it hurts American workers too because we are losing skills that we need to try to get back and we're losing good-paying jobs."


Kunce argued that the U.S. economy and the individuals that control it pursue profit and "self-interest above everything else," which, he claims, China has used to its advantage.

"They figured out that all of the things that we build and create in our industries are controlled by individuals, and these individuals are subject to the profit slave," he said.


"So if they want to get our industries, our intellectual property, our manufacturing base, anything, all they have to do is make it profitable for those individuals to make the decision to go to China, and they'll do it," he added.


Last week, in another major setback to China, the US designated 58 Chinese companies out of 103 companies as foreign entities with military ties thereby restricting export, re-export and transfers with them.


Along with the 58 Chinese companies, the remaining are Russian companies, the US Commerce Department said.

According to a statement from the Commerce Department, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) will amend the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) by adding a new 'Military End User' (MEU) List, as well as the first tranche of 103 entities, which includes 58 Chinese and 45 Russian companies.


"This action establishes a new process to designate military end-users on the MEU List to assist exporters in screening their customers for military end-users," said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross as quoted by the statement.

Ross said that the department recognizes the importance of leveraging its partnerships with the U.S. and global companies to combat efforts by China and Russia to divert U.S. technology for their destabilizing military programs.


Source

 

Washington: China, over the past year, has strategically captured the entire supply chain of United States, making it vulnerable and dependent on Beijing, said Lucas Kunce, the national security director at the American Economic Liberties Project.

Kunce told The Hill that the business people who testified during recent congressional hearings on tariffs revealed that the US cannot produce essential products including certain weapons systems and US dollars "without some components or resources coming from China."

"So China has strategically captured our entire supply chain," he told The Hill. "And it makes us vulnerable, and it hurts American workers too because we are losing skills that we need to try to get back and we're losing good-paying jobs."


Kunce argued that the U.S. economy and the individuals that control it pursue profit and "self-interest above everything else," which, he claims, China has used to its advantage.

"They figured out that all of the things that we build and create in our industries are controlled by individuals, and these individuals are subject to the profit slave," he said.


"So if they want to get our industries, our intellectual property, our manufacturing base, anything, all they have to do is make it profitable for those individuals to make the decision to go to China, and they'll do it," he added.


Last week, in another major setback to China, the US designated 58 Chinese companies out of 103 companies as foreign entities with military ties thereby restricting export, re-export and transfers with them.


Along with the 58 Chinese companies, the remaining are Russian companies, the US Commerce Department said.

According to a statement from the Commerce Department, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) will amend the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) by adding a new 'Military End User' (MEU) List, as well as the first tranche of 103 entities, which includes 58 Chinese and 45 Russian companies.


"This action establishes a new process to designate military end-users on the MEU List to assist exporters in screening their customers for military end-users," said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross as quoted by the statement.

Ross said that the department recognizes the importance of leveraging its partnerships with the U.S. and global companies to combat efforts by China and Russia to divert U.S. technology for their destabilizing military programs.


Source

China to surpass U.S. as world's biggest economy by 2028, says report

China to surpass U.S. as world's biggest economy by 2028, says report


China will overtake the United States to become the world's biggest economy in 2028, five years earlier than previously estimated due to the contrasting recoveries of the two countries from the Covid-19 pandemic, a think tank said.


"For some time, an overarching theme of global economics has been the economic and soft power struggle between the United States and China," the Centre for Economics and Business Research said in an annual report published on Saturday. "The COVID-19 pandemic and corresponding economic fallout have certainly tipped this rivalry in China's favour."


The CEBR said China's "skilful management of the pandemic", with its strict early lockdown, and hits to long-term growth in the West meant China's relative economic performance had improved.


China looked set for average economic growth of 5.7% a year from 2021-25 before slowing to 4.5% a year from 2026-30.


While the United States was likely to have a strong post-pandemic rebound in 2021, its growth would slow to 1.9% a year between 2022 and 2024, and then to 1.6% after that.


Japan would remain the world's third-biggest economy, in dollar terms, until the early 2030s when it would be overtaken by India, pushing Germany down from fourth to fifth.


The United Kingdom, currently the fifth-biggest economy by the CEBR's measure, would slip to sixth place from 2024.


However, despite a hit in 2021 from its exit from the European Union's single market, British GDP in dollars was forecast to be 23% higher than France's by 2035, helped by Britain's lead in the increasingly important digital economy.


Europe accounted for 19% of output in the top 10 global economies in 2020 but that will fall to 12% by 2035, or lower if there is an acrimonious split between the EU and Britain, the CEBR said.


It also said the pandemic's impact on the global economy was likely to show up in higher inflation, not slower growth.


"We see an economic cycle with rising interest rates in the mid-2020s," it said, posing a challenge for governments which have borrowed massively to fund their response to the COVID-19 crisis. "But the underlying trends that have been accelerated by this point to a greener and more tech-based world as we move into the 2030s."


China will overtake the United States to become the world's biggest economy in 2028, five years earlier than previously estimated due to the contrasting recoveries of the two countries from the Covid-19 pandemic, a think tank said.


"For some time, an overarching theme of global economics has been the economic and soft power struggle between the United States and China," the Centre for Economics and Business Research said in an annual report published on Saturday. "The COVID-19 pandemic and corresponding economic fallout have certainly tipped this rivalry in China's favour."


The CEBR said China's "skilful management of the pandemic", with its strict early lockdown, and hits to long-term growth in the West meant China's relative economic performance had improved.


China looked set for average economic growth of 5.7% a year from 2021-25 before slowing to 4.5% a year from 2026-30.


While the United States was likely to have a strong post-pandemic rebound in 2021, its growth would slow to 1.9% a year between 2022 and 2024, and then to 1.6% after that.


Japan would remain the world's third-biggest economy, in dollar terms, until the early 2030s when it would be overtaken by India, pushing Germany down from fourth to fifth.


The United Kingdom, currently the fifth-biggest economy by the CEBR's measure, would slip to sixth place from 2024.


However, despite a hit in 2021 from its exit from the European Union's single market, British GDP in dollars was forecast to be 23% higher than France's by 2035, helped by Britain's lead in the increasingly important digital economy.


Europe accounted for 19% of output in the top 10 global economies in 2020 but that will fall to 12% by 2035, or lower if there is an acrimonious split between the EU and Britain, the CEBR said.


It also said the pandemic's impact on the global economy was likely to show up in higher inflation, not slower growth.


"We see an economic cycle with rising interest rates in the mid-2020s," it said, posing a challenge for governments which have borrowed massively to fund their response to the COVID-19 crisis. "But the underlying trends that have been accelerated by this point to a greener and more tech-based world as we move into the 2030s."

Chinese museum receives Jubilee medal from Russia on war memorial day

Chinese museum receives Jubilee medal from Russia on war memorial day


Russian Ambassador to China Andrey Denisov on Sunday presented the Jubilee Medal "75 Years of Victory in the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945" to the Museum of the Chinese People's War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression in Beijing, the first time that such a medal was awarded to an institution rather than individuals.

The medal was issued by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It is the first time that the Russian government has awarded the medal to representatives of outstanding units that told the history of World War II, spread the concept of peace and promoted friendship between Russia and China. Previously, the medal was awarded only to individual representatives of veterans who had made outstanding contributions to the Patriotic War and the World Anti-Fascist War.

The award ceremony took place at the opening of the exhibition "Patriotic War through the Lens of Women Photojournalists" on Sunday. A total of 107 photographs of the Patriotic War taken by well-known Soviet female photojournalists are on display.

First of all, Russia conferring a Jubilee Medal to a Chinese war-themed museum signals the close ties and active cultural interactions between the two countries, Li Xing, a professor at the School of Government of Beijing Normal University, told the Global Times on Sunday.

Li noted that China and Russia share the same stance concerning the World Anti-Fascist War - respecting historical truths and recognizing both countries' commitment and contribution to the final victory.

Moreover, remembering history also has a realistic significance, Li said.

Observers warned that some historical revisionist forces have dangerously distorted the historical narrative, which shakes the basis for the post-War order, multilateralism and peaceful development principles.

Sunday also marks China's seventh National Memorial Day for the more than 300,000 victims of the Nanjing Massacre, which took place as Japanese troops captured Nanjing 83 years ago. The painful history is testimony of how Chinese people fought against the Japanese invaders during the World Anti-Fascist War.

At the memorial service, participants sang the Chinese national anthem, observed a moment of silence and laid flowers to express their deep condolences and remembrance of compatriots and martyrs who were killed in the Nanjing Massacre and World War II.

Russian Ambassador to China Andrey Denisov on Sunday presented the Jubilee Medal "75 Years of Victory in the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945" to the Museum of the Chinese People's War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression in Beijing, the first time that such a medal was awarded to an institution rather than individuals.

The medal was issued by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It is the first time that the Russian government has awarded the medal to representatives of outstanding units that told the history of World War II, spread the concept of peace and promoted friendship between Russia and China. Previously, the medal was awarded only to individual representatives of veterans who had made outstanding contributions to the Patriotic War and the World Anti-Fascist War.

The award ceremony took place at the opening of the exhibition "Patriotic War through the Lens of Women Photojournalists" on Sunday. A total of 107 photographs of the Patriotic War taken by well-known Soviet female photojournalists are on display.

First of all, Russia conferring a Jubilee Medal to a Chinese war-themed museum signals the close ties and active cultural interactions between the two countries, Li Xing, a professor at the School of Government of Beijing Normal University, told the Global Times on Sunday.

Li noted that China and Russia share the same stance concerning the World Anti-Fascist War - respecting historical truths and recognizing both countries' commitment and contribution to the final victory.

Moreover, remembering history also has a realistic significance, Li said.

Observers warned that some historical revisionist forces have dangerously distorted the historical narrative, which shakes the basis for the post-War order, multilateralism and peaceful development principles.

Sunday also marks China's seventh National Memorial Day for the more than 300,000 victims of the Nanjing Massacre, which took place as Japanese troops captured Nanjing 83 years ago. The painful history is testimony of how Chinese people fought against the Japanese invaders during the World Anti-Fascist War.

At the memorial service, participants sang the Chinese national anthem, observed a moment of silence and laid flowers to express their deep condolences and remembrance of compatriots and martyrs who were killed in the Nanjing Massacre and World War II.

India, China Set for 7th Round of Military Talks Over Ladakh Border Dispute

India, China Set for 7th Round of Military Talks Over Ladakh Border Dispute





India and China will hold on Monday the seventh round of negotiations between their military commanders for the disengagement of troops along the so-called Line of Actual Control (LAC) that demarcates their territories across the Himalayas in the Ladakh region.

The talks are scheduled to begin at noon local time (06:30 GMT) in the Chushul village on the Chinese side of the LAC.

As reported by Indian media, New Delhi during the talks will seek complete demilitarisation of East Ladakh, proposing that Beijing be the first to reduce the number of troops in the region, withdrawing troops specifically from the northern and southern banks of Lake Pangong.

China, in turn, is reportedly expected to suggest that India withdraw troops first from the southern bank of Pangong.
Since the 1962 war between India and China, the two lack a duly demarcated borderline in the Himalayas. As a consequence, the area has since frequented seeing hassles between the military of both sides.

Following a deadly escalation in the Pangong vicinity in May, India and China boosted their military presence in the disputed region. The latest clash took place in early September, with the sides blaming the initiation of the firing on each other.

India and China have launched consultations on the highest military level to try to settle the long-standing border disagreements. The sixth round of talks took place in late September.


Source: (Sputnik) 






India and China will hold on Monday the seventh round of negotiations between their military commanders for the disengagement of troops along the so-called Line of Actual Control (LAC) that demarcates their territories across the Himalayas in the Ladakh region.

The talks are scheduled to begin at noon local time (06:30 GMT) in the Chushul village on the Chinese side of the LAC.

As reported by Indian media, New Delhi during the talks will seek complete demilitarisation of East Ladakh, proposing that Beijing be the first to reduce the number of troops in the region, withdrawing troops specifically from the northern and southern banks of Lake Pangong.

China, in turn, is reportedly expected to suggest that India withdraw troops first from the southern bank of Pangong.
Since the 1962 war between India and China, the two lack a duly demarcated borderline in the Himalayas. As a consequence, the area has since frequented seeing hassles between the military of both sides.

Following a deadly escalation in the Pangong vicinity in May, India and China boosted their military presence in the disputed region. The latest clash took place in early September, with the sides blaming the initiation of the firing on each other.

India and China have launched consultations on the highest military level to try to settle the long-standing border disagreements. The sixth round of talks took place in late September.


Source: (Sputnik) 


UN experts 'meddling' in Hong Kong affairs: Chinese foreign ministry

UN experts 'meddling' in Hong Kong affairs: Chinese foreign ministry


(AFP) BEIJING, Sept 4 — China issued a fierce rebuke today to UN experts who said a draconian national security law imposed upon Hong Kong poses a serious risk to the city’s freedoms and breaches international legal obligations.

Beijing has faced a barrage of criticism over the legislation, imposed late June after pro-democracy protests rocked the semi-autonomous city last year.

The law, which criminalises secession, subversion, terrorism and colluding with foreign forces, carries a maximum life sentence and has intimidated many protesters into silence.

In a letter made public today, the UN special rapporteurs on human rights warned parts of the legislation “appear to criminalise freedom of expression or any form of criticism” of China.

In customarily strong language, China’s foreign ministry was swift to strike down the allegations, saying the law “punishes an extremely small number and protects the absolute majority” in the financial hub.

“Some people disregard the facts and maliciously slander China’s human rights situation... and crudely interfere in China’s internal affairs,” ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters.

“Stop meddling in Hong Kong affairs and China’s affairs in any way.”

Hong Kong lurched into chaos last year as pro-democracy protesters — furious at perceived encroachment by China on the city’s freedoms — clashed with police.

Unrest has simmered down thanks to coronavirus restrictions and the chilling effect of the security law — under which more than 20 people have been arrested, including a prominent media tycoon.

The letter by the UN advisors — the first issued since the law blanketed the southern Chinese city — gave a vigorous dissection of the damage being inflicted upon the freedoms once enjoyed in Hong Kong, enshrined in an agreement made before the 1997 handover from British colonial rule back to China.

The security law “poses a serious risk that those fundamental freedoms and due process protections may be infringed upon”, the rapporteurs said.

The letter warned the legislation could “impinge impermissibly on the rights to freedom of opinion, expression and of peaceful assembly”.

The rapporteurs urged China’s “reconsideration” of the legislation and for a fully independent reviewer to be appointed to ensure it complies with China’s international human rights obligations.

They also expressed concern over one of the most controversial points of the law — which allows cases to be transferred from the jurisdiction of Hong Kong to mainland China — and warned it could undermine the right to a fair trial.

The broadly worded law criminalised certain political speech overnight, such as advocating sanctions against China or greater autonomy or independence for Hong Kong.

Lawyers for some of the more than 20 people arrested under the law so far say police are trawling historical actions of pro-democracy activists to beef up their cases.

The UN experts also raised concerns over the definition of terrorism under the national security law.

They warned it extends to damage of physical property such as transport facilities — which goes well beyond the UN Security Council’s definition of terrorist conduct as aiming to cause death or serious bodily harm. — AFP

(AFP) BEIJING, Sept 4 — China issued a fierce rebuke today to UN experts who said a draconian national security law imposed upon Hong Kong poses a serious risk to the city’s freedoms and breaches international legal obligations.

Beijing has faced a barrage of criticism over the legislation, imposed late June after pro-democracy protests rocked the semi-autonomous city last year.

The law, which criminalises secession, subversion, terrorism and colluding with foreign forces, carries a maximum life sentence and has intimidated many protesters into silence.

In a letter made public today, the UN special rapporteurs on human rights warned parts of the legislation “appear to criminalise freedom of expression or any form of criticism” of China.

In customarily strong language, China’s foreign ministry was swift to strike down the allegations, saying the law “punishes an extremely small number and protects the absolute majority” in the financial hub.

“Some people disregard the facts and maliciously slander China’s human rights situation... and crudely interfere in China’s internal affairs,” ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters.

“Stop meddling in Hong Kong affairs and China’s affairs in any way.”

Hong Kong lurched into chaos last year as pro-democracy protesters — furious at perceived encroachment by China on the city’s freedoms — clashed with police.

Unrest has simmered down thanks to coronavirus restrictions and the chilling effect of the security law — under which more than 20 people have been arrested, including a prominent media tycoon.

The letter by the UN advisors — the first issued since the law blanketed the southern Chinese city — gave a vigorous dissection of the damage being inflicted upon the freedoms once enjoyed in Hong Kong, enshrined in an agreement made before the 1997 handover from British colonial rule back to China.

The security law “poses a serious risk that those fundamental freedoms and due process protections may be infringed upon”, the rapporteurs said.

The letter warned the legislation could “impinge impermissibly on the rights to freedom of opinion, expression and of peaceful assembly”.

The rapporteurs urged China’s “reconsideration” of the legislation and for a fully independent reviewer to be appointed to ensure it complies with China’s international human rights obligations.

They also expressed concern over one of the most controversial points of the law — which allows cases to be transferred from the jurisdiction of Hong Kong to mainland China — and warned it could undermine the right to a fair trial.

The broadly worded law criminalised certain political speech overnight, such as advocating sanctions against China or greater autonomy or independence for Hong Kong.

Lawyers for some of the more than 20 people arrested under the law so far say police are trawling historical actions of pro-democracy activists to beef up their cases.

The UN experts also raised concerns over the definition of terrorism under the national security law.

They warned it extends to damage of physical property such as transport facilities — which goes well beyond the UN Security Council’s definition of terrorist conduct as aiming to cause death or serious bodily harm. — AFP

Sputnik: India on high alert as defense chief says China and Pakistan are coordinating against them

Sputnik: India on high alert as defense chief says China and Pakistan are coordinating against them

India’s Chief of Defense Staff General Bipin Rawat

India has put its security agencies and forces on high alert after a skirmish with the Chinese military on the evening of August 29th and New Delhi’s claim that Pakistan is allegedly trying to take advantage of the situation to infiltrate the Ladakh region, Sputnik reported.


According to the Sputnik report citing a senior official from the Indian security forces, the Pakistan is capable of taking advantage of the issue going on between India and China. 

“We have taken adequate precautionary measures to ensure that Pakistan does not succeed in their mission to enter the valley. "

"There have been situations where Pakistan has been involved in a proxy war against us (India). It was learnt that the terrorists are trying to infiltrate Jammu and Kashmir to carry out attacks as the focus is completely on China”, the official from the Indian security forces told Sputnik.

On Thursday, India’s Chief of Defense Staff General Bipin Rawat also stated the Indian troops are well prepared to face a coordinated threat from Pakistan and China as Beijing continues to lend support to Islamabad in Pakistan-administered Kashmir.

Rawat has warned Pakistan against trying to take advantage, while stating it may suffer heavy losses for any misadventure.

India and China have been involved in several face-offs at multiple junctions across the LAC since May. While following the recent clashes in Chushul, the two sides have been engaged in commander-level talks to advance the settlement of the bilateral border dispute rather than armed provocations aimed at a unilateral change of the status quo.

Source: Sputnik
India’s Chief of Defense Staff General Bipin Rawat

India has put its security agencies and forces on high alert after a skirmish with the Chinese military on the evening of August 29th and New Delhi’s claim that Pakistan is allegedly trying to take advantage of the situation to infiltrate the Ladakh region, Sputnik reported.


According to the Sputnik report citing a senior official from the Indian security forces, the Pakistan is capable of taking advantage of the issue going on between India and China. 

“We have taken adequate precautionary measures to ensure that Pakistan does not succeed in their mission to enter the valley. "

"There have been situations where Pakistan has been involved in a proxy war against us (India). It was learnt that the terrorists are trying to infiltrate Jammu and Kashmir to carry out attacks as the focus is completely on China”, the official from the Indian security forces told Sputnik.

On Thursday, India’s Chief of Defense Staff General Bipin Rawat also stated the Indian troops are well prepared to face a coordinated threat from Pakistan and China as Beijing continues to lend support to Islamabad in Pakistan-administered Kashmir.

Rawat has warned Pakistan against trying to take advantage, while stating it may suffer heavy losses for any misadventure.

India and China have been involved in several face-offs at multiple junctions across the LAC since May. While following the recent clashes in Chushul, the two sides have been engaged in commander-level talks to advance the settlement of the bilateral border dispute rather than armed provocations aimed at a unilateral change of the status quo.

Source: Sputnik

Iran cries victory after UN rejects US bid to extend arms embargo, says United States failed in this conspiracy with humiliation

Iran cries victory after UN rejects US bid to extend arms embargo, says United States failed in this conspiracy with humiliation

Iranian Hassan Rouhani
(AFP) Iran on Saturday hailed a UN Security Council vote rejecting a US bid to extend an arms embargo on the Islamic republic, saying its foe has "never been so isolated". President Hassan Rouhani said the United States had failed to kill off what he called the "half alive" 2015 deal with major powers that gave Iran relief from sanctions in exchange for curbs on its nuclear programme.

"The United States failed in this conspiracy with humiliation," Rouhani told a televised news conference. "In my opinion, this day will go down in the history of our Iran and in the history of fighting global arrogance."

Only two of the Council's 15 members voted in favour of the US resolution seeking to extend the embargo, highlighting the division between Washington and its European allies since President Donald Trump withdrew from the Iran nuclear accord in May 2018.

Washington's European allies all abstained, and Iran mocked the Trump administration for only winning the support of one other country, the Dominican Republic.

"In the 75 years of United Nations history, America has never been so isolated," said foreign ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi.

"Despite all the trips, pressure and the hawking, the United States could only mobilise a small country (to vote) with them," he tweeted. The result increases the likelihood that the US will try to unilaterally force a return of UN sanctions, which experts say threatens to plunge the Council into one of its worst-ever diplomatic crises.


- 'Inexcusable' -


"The Security Council's failure to act decisively in defence of international peace and security is inexcusable," said US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

The embargo on conventional arms is due to expire on October 18 under the terms of a resolution that blessed the Iran nuclear deal, officially known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

Since Trump pulled out of the JCPOA and slapped unilateral sanctions on Iran under a campaign of "maximum pressure", Tehran has since taken small but escalating steps away from compliance with the nuclear accord as it presses for sanctions relief.

European allies of the United States -- who, along with Russia and China, signed the deal with Iran -- have voiced support for extending the 13-year-long conventional arms embargo, saying an expiry threatens stability in the Middle East.

However, their priority is to preserve the JCPOA.

The US text, seen by AFP, effectively called for an indefinite extension of the embargo on Iran, which diplomats said would threaten the nuclear agreement.

Iran says it has the right to self-defence and that a continuation of the ban would mean an end to the nuclear deal.

Pompeo announced that members had failed to back the proposal around 30 minutes before Indonesia, the current president of the Security Council, announced that the official results included two votes against and 11 abstentions.

Russia and China opposed the resolution.

"The result shows again that unilateralism enjoys no support, and bullying will fail," China's UN mission tweeted.


- 'Snapback' -


Ambassador Gunter Sautter of Germany, which abstained, said "more consultations are needed" to find a solution that is acceptable to all council members.

During a call between Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron, the leaders "discussed the urgent need for UN action to extend the arms embargo on Iran".

Hours earlier, Russian President Vladimir Putin called on China, France, Russia, Britain, the US, Germany and Iran to convene an emergency video summit to avoid an escalation of tensions in the Gulf.

Washington has threatened to try to force a return of UN sanctions if it is not extended by using a controversial technique called "snapback".

Pompeo has offered the contested argument that the US remains a "participant" in the nuclear accord as it was listed in the 2015 resolution -- and therefore can force a return to sanctions if it sees Iran as being in violation of its terms.

European allies have been sceptical on whether Washington can force sanctions and warn that the attempt may delegitimise the Security Council.

Nevertheless, the US is expected to deliver the snapback letter next week, AFP understands.

Analysts suspect that Washington purposefully put forward a hardline draft that it knew Council members would not be able to accept.

"The fact is that everybody at the UN believes this (resolution) is just a prelude to a US effort to trigger snapback and sink the Iranian nuclear deal," Richard Gowan, a UN expert at the International Crisis Group, told AFP.

pdh-fff/ap/dv/kir
Iranian Hassan Rouhani
(AFP) Iran on Saturday hailed a UN Security Council vote rejecting a US bid to extend an arms embargo on the Islamic republic, saying its foe has "never been so isolated". President Hassan Rouhani said the United States had failed to kill off what he called the "half alive" 2015 deal with major powers that gave Iran relief from sanctions in exchange for curbs on its nuclear programme.

"The United States failed in this conspiracy with humiliation," Rouhani told a televised news conference. "In my opinion, this day will go down in the history of our Iran and in the history of fighting global arrogance."

Only two of the Council's 15 members voted in favour of the US resolution seeking to extend the embargo, highlighting the division between Washington and its European allies since President Donald Trump withdrew from the Iran nuclear accord in May 2018.

Washington's European allies all abstained, and Iran mocked the Trump administration for only winning the support of one other country, the Dominican Republic.

"In the 75 years of United Nations history, America has never been so isolated," said foreign ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi.

"Despite all the trips, pressure and the hawking, the United States could only mobilise a small country (to vote) with them," he tweeted. The result increases the likelihood that the US will try to unilaterally force a return of UN sanctions, which experts say threatens to plunge the Council into one of its worst-ever diplomatic crises.


- 'Inexcusable' -


"The Security Council's failure to act decisively in defence of international peace and security is inexcusable," said US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

The embargo on conventional arms is due to expire on October 18 under the terms of a resolution that blessed the Iran nuclear deal, officially known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

Since Trump pulled out of the JCPOA and slapped unilateral sanctions on Iran under a campaign of "maximum pressure", Tehran has since taken small but escalating steps away from compliance with the nuclear accord as it presses for sanctions relief.

European allies of the United States -- who, along with Russia and China, signed the deal with Iran -- have voiced support for extending the 13-year-long conventional arms embargo, saying an expiry threatens stability in the Middle East.

However, their priority is to preserve the JCPOA.

The US text, seen by AFP, effectively called for an indefinite extension of the embargo on Iran, which diplomats said would threaten the nuclear agreement.

Iran says it has the right to self-defence and that a continuation of the ban would mean an end to the nuclear deal.

Pompeo announced that members had failed to back the proposal around 30 minutes before Indonesia, the current president of the Security Council, announced that the official results included two votes against and 11 abstentions.

Russia and China opposed the resolution.

"The result shows again that unilateralism enjoys no support, and bullying will fail," China's UN mission tweeted.


- 'Snapback' -


Ambassador Gunter Sautter of Germany, which abstained, said "more consultations are needed" to find a solution that is acceptable to all council members.

During a call between Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron, the leaders "discussed the urgent need for UN action to extend the arms embargo on Iran".

Hours earlier, Russian President Vladimir Putin called on China, France, Russia, Britain, the US, Germany and Iran to convene an emergency video summit to avoid an escalation of tensions in the Gulf.

Washington has threatened to try to force a return of UN sanctions if it is not extended by using a controversial technique called "snapback".

Pompeo has offered the contested argument that the US remains a "participant" in the nuclear accord as it was listed in the 2015 resolution -- and therefore can force a return to sanctions if it sees Iran as being in violation of its terms.

European allies have been sceptical on whether Washington can force sanctions and warn that the attempt may delegitimise the Security Council.

Nevertheless, the US is expected to deliver the snapback letter next week, AFP understands.

Analysts suspect that Washington purposefully put forward a hardline draft that it knew Council members would not be able to accept.

"The fact is that everybody at the UN believes this (resolution) is just a prelude to a US effort to trigger snapback and sink the Iranian nuclear deal," Richard Gowan, a UN expert at the International Crisis Group, told AFP.

pdh-fff/ap/dv/kir

Indian Modi warns China over border tensions

Indian Modi warns China over border tensions

AFP: India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi issued a new warning to China over deadly border tensions on Saturday, using his most important speech of the year to promise to build a stronger military.

With talks on easing a military build-up in their Himalayan border region at a stalemate, Modi told an Independence Day ceremony that India's sovereignty was "supreme" and that relations with neighbours depended on security and trust.

Attendance at the historic Red Fort in New Delhi for the speech was cut by more than half to 4,000 people, all of whom sat two metres (six feet) apart because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Hindu nationalist prime minister mentioned confrontations with Pakistan and China on their disputed borders, but without naming either country.

"Anyone who has cast an eye on the country's sovereignty, the country's army has answered them in their own language," he said.

"India's integrity is supreme for us. What we can do, what our soldiers can do -- everyone saw that in Ladakh," referring to a border clash with Chinese troops in the Ladakh region of the Himalayas on June 15.

Twenty Indian soldiers were killed in the clash, which saw the two sides fighting with batons, stones and bare fists.

China has also acknowledged that it suffered casualties but without giving numbers.

The two sides have blamed each other for the fighting and tens of thousands of Indian and Chinese troops, who also fought a border war in 1962, have since been sent to the region.

Modi has insisted that no land was lost in the battle but military experts have used satellite images to counter that Chinese troops occupy frontier territory that India had claimed for decades.

India has in turn used economic weapons against China. It has banned at least 59 apps, including the major video-sharing platform TikTok, and taken other measures to freeze Chinese firms out of contracts and block its imports.

Modi said that relations with neighbours are now linked to "security, progress and trust".


"A neighbour isn't just someone who shares our geography but those who share our hearts. Where the relationship is respected, it becomes warmer," he said.

The 1.4-million-strong military would be built up, he added.

"India is just as committed to its security and strengthening its army as the attempts it has made for peace and harmony," he said, stressing efforts to make India "self-reliant" in defence production.

Modi also said that his priority was getting India out of the crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

India is expected to pass 50,000 deaths in the coming days and three million cases within a week. It has the fastest-growing caseload in the world and is now only behind Brazil and the United States in terms of total case numbers.

With the economy expected to shrink this year, Modi reaffirmed an election promise to spend 1.3 trillion dollars on 7,000 infrastructure projects "to get us out of the pandemic situation".

bb/tw/jah

AFP: India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi issued a new warning to China over deadly border tensions on Saturday, using his most important speech of the year to promise to build a stronger military.

With talks on easing a military build-up in their Himalayan border region at a stalemate, Modi told an Independence Day ceremony that India's sovereignty was "supreme" and that relations with neighbours depended on security and trust.

Attendance at the historic Red Fort in New Delhi for the speech was cut by more than half to 4,000 people, all of whom sat two metres (six feet) apart because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Hindu nationalist prime minister mentioned confrontations with Pakistan and China on their disputed borders, but without naming either country.

"Anyone who has cast an eye on the country's sovereignty, the country's army has answered them in their own language," he said.

"India's integrity is supreme for us. What we can do, what our soldiers can do -- everyone saw that in Ladakh," referring to a border clash with Chinese troops in the Ladakh region of the Himalayas on June 15.

Twenty Indian soldiers were killed in the clash, which saw the two sides fighting with batons, stones and bare fists.

China has also acknowledged that it suffered casualties but without giving numbers.

The two sides have blamed each other for the fighting and tens of thousands of Indian and Chinese troops, who also fought a border war in 1962, have since been sent to the region.

Modi has insisted that no land was lost in the battle but military experts have used satellite images to counter that Chinese troops occupy frontier territory that India had claimed for decades.

India has in turn used economic weapons against China. It has banned at least 59 apps, including the major video-sharing platform TikTok, and taken other measures to freeze Chinese firms out of contracts and block its imports.

Modi said that relations with neighbours are now linked to "security, progress and trust".


"A neighbour isn't just someone who shares our geography but those who share our hearts. Where the relationship is respected, it becomes warmer," he said.

The 1.4-million-strong military would be built up, he added.

"India is just as committed to its security and strengthening its army as the attempts it has made for peace and harmony," he said, stressing efforts to make India "self-reliant" in defence production.

Modi also said that his priority was getting India out of the crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

India is expected to pass 50,000 deaths in the coming days and three million cases within a week. It has the fastest-growing caseload in the world and is now only behind Brazil and the United States in terms of total case numbers.

With the economy expected to shrink this year, Modi reaffirmed an election promise to spend 1.3 trillion dollars on 7,000 infrastructure projects "to get us out of the pandemic situation".

bb/tw/jah

India seeks to counter China sway in Maldives with bridge project

India seeks to counter China sway in Maldives with bridge project

Profile Picture
AFP: India on Thursday pledged $500 million to build bridges and causeways in the Maldives, as New Delhi seeks to counter growing Chinese influence in the Indian Ocean.

The Maldives borrowed billions of dollars from Beijing and hired Chinese firms for infrastructure projects under previous President Abdulla Yameen.

This stoked concerns in India and the West that China was saddling countries in Asia and beyond with unsustainable debts while expanding its sphere of influence.

Under the new Maldives government, India has sought to regain influence in the archipelago nation of 340,000 people and 1,192 islands located on major East-West shipping lanes.

The new investment announced takes India's total pledged outlay to over $2 billion since President Ibrahim Mohamed Solih came to power, India's foreign ministry said.

Maldives Foreign Minister Abdulla Shahid said the new money was part of a financial package to build bridges and causeways linking the capital Male to three neighbouring islets.

"Once completed, the project will be the single largest infrastructure project in the Maldives," Shahid said in a statement.

In total, they will also be more than three times longer than the $200-million "China-Maldives Friendship Bridge" completed under Yameen with Chinese loans which has since been re-named.

It was not clear how long the new project would take.

Shahid also said his Indian counterpart Subrahmanyam Jaishankar in their talks Thursday had pledged $250 million to meet urgent needs and support efforts to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

The virus has infected over 5,300 people and claimed 21 lives in the Maldives, where its crucial tourism industry took a battering.

"There has been a reset in our relations," an Indian diplomat said after the bilateral talks via video conference.

"In the last one-and-a-half years, President Solih and his government have acted on its 'India First' policy in right earnest. In line with its 'Neighbourhood First' policy, India has worked proactively to deepen its ties with the Maldives."

aj/stu/je

Profile Picture
AFP: India on Thursday pledged $500 million to build bridges and causeways in the Maldives, as New Delhi seeks to counter growing Chinese influence in the Indian Ocean.

The Maldives borrowed billions of dollars from Beijing and hired Chinese firms for infrastructure projects under previous President Abdulla Yameen.

This stoked concerns in India and the West that China was saddling countries in Asia and beyond with unsustainable debts while expanding its sphere of influence.

Under the new Maldives government, India has sought to regain influence in the archipelago nation of 340,000 people and 1,192 islands located on major East-West shipping lanes.

The new investment announced takes India's total pledged outlay to over $2 billion since President Ibrahim Mohamed Solih came to power, India's foreign ministry said.

Maldives Foreign Minister Abdulla Shahid said the new money was part of a financial package to build bridges and causeways linking the capital Male to three neighbouring islets.

"Once completed, the project will be the single largest infrastructure project in the Maldives," Shahid said in a statement.

In total, they will also be more than three times longer than the $200-million "China-Maldives Friendship Bridge" completed under Yameen with Chinese loans which has since been re-named.

It was not clear how long the new project would take.

Shahid also said his Indian counterpart Subrahmanyam Jaishankar in their talks Thursday had pledged $250 million to meet urgent needs and support efforts to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

The virus has infected over 5,300 people and claimed 21 lives in the Maldives, where its crucial tourism industry took a battering.

"There has been a reset in our relations," an Indian diplomat said after the bilateral talks via video conference.

"In the last one-and-a-half years, President Solih and his government have acted on its 'India First' policy in right earnest. In line with its 'Neighbourhood First' policy, India has worked proactively to deepen its ties with the Maldives."

aj/stu/je

China sanctions 11 Americans, including senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, in retaliation for similar US moves over Hong Kong

China sanctions 11 Americans, including senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, in retaliation for similar US moves over Hong Kong


Beijing:  China on Monday sanctioned 11 Americans, including senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, in retaliation for similar US moves prompted by Beijing's crackdown in Hong Kong.

Washington last week accused 11 officials of suppressing "freedom and democratic processes" in Hong Kong, including city leader Carrie Lam, and announced plans to freeze their US assets.

It was the toughest US action yet in response to Beijing's introduction of a sweeping and controversial new national security law for the territory.

Beijing said the measure was a violation of international law and "grossly interferes in China's internal affairs".

"China has decided to impose sanctions on some people that behaved badly on Hong Kong-related issues," foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said Monday, with Human Rights Watch director Kenneth Roth and National Endowment for Democracy president Carl Gershman also on the list.

Zhao did not give details of what the sanctions would entail.

Republican senators Rubio and Cruz established themselves as two of the most vocal supporters of Hong Kong's democracy movement last year, when the city was convulsed by huge and sometimes violent protests.

Beijing has accused "external forces" of fomenting unrest and responded to the unrest by imposing the security law in late June, sending a political chill through the semi-autonomous finance hub.

Since then, the city's leaders have postponed local elections, citing the coronavirus pandemic.

Authorities have also issued arrest warrants for six exiled pro-democracy activists and launched a crackdown on other activists.

On Monday, Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai, one of the city's most vocal Beijing critics, was arrested under the security law.

- China-US clashes -

The US measures come three months ahead of the November presidential election in which the incumbent Donald Trump, who trails his rival Joe Biden in the polls, is campaigning hard on an increasingly strident anti-Beijing message.

As public disapproval has grown for his handling of the pandemic, Trump has pivoted from his previous focus on striking a trade deal with China to blaming the country for the coronavirus crisis.

Washington and Beijing have sparred on multiple fronts in recent months, and both sides have already imposed sanctions on each other over China's mass internment of mostly Muslim minorities in Xinjiang.

Trump on Thursday ordered Americans to stop doing business within 45 days with popular Chinese apps WeChat and TikTok.

The order claimed TikTok could be used by China to track the locations of federal employees, build dossiers on people for blackmail and conduct corporate espionage.


NDTV


Beijing:  China on Monday sanctioned 11 Americans, including senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, in retaliation for similar US moves prompted by Beijing's crackdown in Hong Kong.

Washington last week accused 11 officials of suppressing "freedom and democratic processes" in Hong Kong, including city leader Carrie Lam, and announced plans to freeze their US assets.

It was the toughest US action yet in response to Beijing's introduction of a sweeping and controversial new national security law for the territory.

Beijing said the measure was a violation of international law and "grossly interferes in China's internal affairs".

"China has decided to impose sanctions on some people that behaved badly on Hong Kong-related issues," foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said Monday, with Human Rights Watch director Kenneth Roth and National Endowment for Democracy president Carl Gershman also on the list.

Zhao did not give details of what the sanctions would entail.

Republican senators Rubio and Cruz established themselves as two of the most vocal supporters of Hong Kong's democracy movement last year, when the city was convulsed by huge and sometimes violent protests.

Beijing has accused "external forces" of fomenting unrest and responded to the unrest by imposing the security law in late June, sending a political chill through the semi-autonomous finance hub.

Since then, the city's leaders have postponed local elections, citing the coronavirus pandemic.

Authorities have also issued arrest warrants for six exiled pro-democracy activists and launched a crackdown on other activists.

On Monday, Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai, one of the city's most vocal Beijing critics, was arrested under the security law.

- China-US clashes -

The US measures come three months ahead of the November presidential election in which the incumbent Donald Trump, who trails his rival Joe Biden in the polls, is campaigning hard on an increasingly strident anti-Beijing message.

As public disapproval has grown for his handling of the pandemic, Trump has pivoted from his previous focus on striking a trade deal with China to blaming the country for the coronavirus crisis.

Washington and Beijing have sparred on multiple fronts in recent months, and both sides have already imposed sanctions on each other over China's mass internment of mostly Muslim minorities in Xinjiang.

Trump on Thursday ordered Americans to stop doing business within 45 days with popular Chinese apps WeChat and TikTok.

The order claimed TikTok could be used by China to track the locations of federal employees, build dossiers on people for blackmail and conduct corporate espionage.


NDTV

COVID-19: US Navy seizes ship carrying supplies from China to Iran - Report

COVID-19: US Navy seizes ship carrying supplies from China to Iran - Report

Profile picture
The U.S. Navy has allegedly seized a ship that was en route to Iran, carrying zeolite needed for manufacturing oxygen concentrators for coronavirus-infected patients, Fars News Agency reported, adding that the U.S. warships seized the ship near the Chinese port of Qingdao on Wednesday morning.

“Only one imported part is used for production of oxygen concentrators, which is zeolite, and we are forced to purchase it from France and import it to the country through several intermediators,” Peyman Bakhshandeh-Nejad, the CEO of Zist Tajhiz Danesh Pouya company in Iran, told the Fars News Agency.

He said that  the ship’s cargo could lead to the production of 4,000 to 5,000 oxygen concentrator systems to be used by the patients.

Bakhshandeh-Nejad dismissed claims that the U.S. sanctions do not leave impacts on Iran’s medical and health sectors.

An oxygen concentrator is a device that concentrates the oxygen from a gas supply (typically ambient air) by selectively removing nitrogen to supply an oxygen-enriched product gas stream.

A pioneering knowledge-based company in Iran had also in April produced a special oxygen concentrator system which can be used by the coronavirus patients at home.

“Oxygen concentrator is the knowledge-based product of the company. When the lungs are not powerful enough to pump the necessary oxygen into the blood, the system can increase the purity of the lungs’ oxygen,” Ali Ebrahimi, the CEO of the company, said.

He added that the system has been manufactured in three home, central and portable versions.

Ebrahimi said that one of the most important applications of oxygen concentrator systems is for coronavirus patients who can use it at home without any need to visiting hospital. AMN
Profile picture
The U.S. Navy has allegedly seized a ship that was en route to Iran, carrying zeolite needed for manufacturing oxygen concentrators for coronavirus-infected patients, Fars News Agency reported, adding that the U.S. warships seized the ship near the Chinese port of Qingdao on Wednesday morning.

“Only one imported part is used for production of oxygen concentrators, which is zeolite, and we are forced to purchase it from France and import it to the country through several intermediators,” Peyman Bakhshandeh-Nejad, the CEO of Zist Tajhiz Danesh Pouya company in Iran, told the Fars News Agency.

He said that  the ship’s cargo could lead to the production of 4,000 to 5,000 oxygen concentrator systems to be used by the patients.

Bakhshandeh-Nejad dismissed claims that the U.S. sanctions do not leave impacts on Iran’s medical and health sectors.

An oxygen concentrator is a device that concentrates the oxygen from a gas supply (typically ambient air) by selectively removing nitrogen to supply an oxygen-enriched product gas stream.

A pioneering knowledge-based company in Iran had also in April produced a special oxygen concentrator system which can be used by the coronavirus patients at home.

“Oxygen concentrator is the knowledge-based product of the company. When the lungs are not powerful enough to pump the necessary oxygen into the blood, the system can increase the purity of the lungs’ oxygen,” Ali Ebrahimi, the CEO of the company, said.

He added that the system has been manufactured in three home, central and portable versions.

Ebrahimi said that one of the most important applications of oxygen concentrator systems is for coronavirus patients who can use it at home without any need to visiting hospital. AMN

Poster Speaks

Poster Speaks/box

Trending

randomposts